На главную
Результаты поиска “Karl schrag gallery girls”
Kid Simius - The Flute Song (Paul Kalkbrenner Remix) [Official Audio]
 
05:06
'The Flute Song' is the new single of the Spanish artist Kid Simius and the first Paul Kalkbrenner remix in a long time. Listen to both tracks here: http://hyperurl.co/theflutesong The collaboration with Kalkbrenner came mid production when Paul overheard the song while hanging out with friends in the studio. The B part hooked him immediately and he was inspired to remix the song before it was even finished. Visual by https://www.instagram.com/houtkruijer/ https://facebook.com/paulkalkbrenner https://twitter.com/paulkalkbrenner https://instagram.com/iampaulkalkbrenner http://paulkalkbrenner.net/ https://facebook.com/kidsimius https://twitter.com/kidsimius https://instagram.com/kidsimius
Просмотров: 2517915 Paul Kalkbrenner
Kylie Jenner lip challenge gone wrong | Kylie Jenner Lip Challenge Vine Compilation Lips fail Vines
 
09:59
This is a Kylie Jenner Lip Challenge Vine Compilation | Kylie Jenner Lips Gone Wrong Challenge Fail Vines Compilation Kylie Jenner Challenge Compilation - Shot Glass #KylieJennerChallenge !!! Kylie Jenner Challenge Gone Wrong Lips gone wrong by doing the Kylie Jenner Challenge. People getting lip damage by doing the Kylie Jenner Lips Gone Wrong on vine.
Просмотров: 1683616 DiTiTiD
The West | ContraPoints
 
23:32
Lots of things have happened in Europe. ✿Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/contrapoints ✿Donate: https://paypal.me/contrapoints ✿Merch: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/contrapoints?ref_id=5379&ref_type=aff ✿Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/ContraPoints ✿Live Stream Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/ContraPointsLive ✿Twitter: https://twitter.com/ContraPoints ✿Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ContraPoints/ ✿Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/contrapoints/ Appiah article: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/nov/09/western-civilisation-appiah-reith-lecture Further reading: https://www.currentaffairs.org/2018/06/dismantling-the-west Music: Overture to "A Midsummer Night's Dream" by Felix Mendelssohn "Vals Op. 8 No. 3" by Agustín Barrios "Waltz in F minor Op. 70 No. 2" by Frederic Chopin "Amicus Meus" by Victoria "Missa pro defunctis - Sanctus" by Asola "12 Variations on a French Nursery Rhyme" and "Laudate Dominum" by W.A. Mozart "Beginnings" "Acid Serum" "Serum Pads" "Sarabande (Handel)" and "Don't Need This" by Zoë Blade ( http://zoeblade.com/ ) "Easy Winners" by Scott Joplin "Gymnopedie No. 3" by Erik Satie Check out my other videos: Tiffany Tumbles: https://youtu.be/j1dJ8whOM8E Jordan Peterson: https://youtu.be/4LqZdkkBDas Capitalism (Part 2): https://youtu.be/AR7ryg1w_IQ Capitalism (Part 1): https://youtu.be/gJW4-cOZt8A America—Still Racist: https://youtu.be/GWwiUIVpmNY Autogynephilia: https://youtu.be/6czRFLs5JQo Violence: https://youtu.be/lmsoVFCUN3Q Degeneracy: https://youtu.be/9BlNGZunYM8 The Left: https://youtu.be/QuN6GfUix7c Decrypting the Alt-Right: https://youtu.be/Sx4BVGPkdzk TERFs: https://youtu.be/AQPWI7cEJGs Gender Dysphoria: https://youtu.be/Ayuqizp4fyY Free Speech (Part 1): https://youtu.be/GGTDhutW_us Free Speech (Part 2): https://youtu.be/IBUuBd5VRbY Debating the Alt-Right: https://youtu.be/zPa1wikTd5c What is Race?: https://youtu.be/PY3lBKje46E What is Gender?: https://youtu.be/b_uEXzqW43c
Просмотров: 635782 ContraPoints
Jacque Fresco - What the Future Holds Beyond 2000 - Nichols College (1999)
 
01:05:02
Jacque Fresco's introduction lecture at Nichols College. Feb. 02, 1999 From archive. http://www.thevenusproject.com/
Просмотров: 252782 Jacque Fresco
The Choice is Ours (2016) Official Full Version
 
01:37:20
https://www.thevenusproject.com Intro: 0:00 Part 1 6:16 Part 2 23:28 Part 3 47:03 Part 4 1:19:09 Produced/Directed by Roxanne Meadows and Joel Holt Script by Roxanne Meadows Editor Joel Holt, assisted by Roxanne Meadows & Nathanael Dinwiddie Original Score by Kat Epple This film series explores many aspects of our society. To rethink what is possible in our world, we need to consider what kind of world we want to live in. Although we refer to it as a civilization, it is anything but civilized. Visions of global unity & fellowship have long inspired humanity, yet the social arrangements up to the present have largely failed to produce a peaceful and productive world. While we appear to be technically advanced, our values and behaviors are not. The possibility of an optimistic future is in stark contrast to our current social, economic, and environmental dilemmas. The Choice Is Ours includes interviews with notable scientists, media professionals, authors, and other thinkers exploring the difficulties we face. Part I provides an introduction and overview of cultural & environmental conditions that are untenable for a sustainable world civilization. It explores the determinants of behavior to dispel the myth of “human nature” while demonstrating how environment shapes behavior. The science of behavior is an important - yet largely missing - ingredient in our culture. Part II questions the values, behaviors, and consequences of our social structures, and illustrates how our global monetary system is obsolete and increasingly insufficient to meet the needs of most people. Critical consideration of the banking, media, and criminal justice systems reveals these institutions for what they really are: tools of social control managed by the established political and economic elite. If we stay the present course, the familiar cycles of crime, economic booms & busts, war, and further environmental destruction are inevitable. Part III explains the methods and potential of science. It proposes solutions that we can apply at present to eliminate the use of non-renewable sources of energy. It depicts the vision of The Venus Project to build an entirely new world from the ground up, a “redesign of the culture”, where all enjoy a high standard of living, free of servitude and debt, while also protecting the environment. Part IV explains how it is not just architecture and a social structure that is in desperate need of change, but our values which have been handed down from centuries ago. They too need to be updated to our technological age, which has the potential to eliminate our scarcity-driven societies of today. Our problems are mostly of our own making, but we can still turn things around before the point of no return. It’s not too late for an optimistic outlook on the fantastic possibilities that lie before us. Jacque Fresco-Futurist, Industrial Designer, Social Engineer, Founder of The Venus Project Jeffrey A. Hoffman Ph.D. - Prof. Aeronautics & Astronautics MIT, Former NASA Astronaut Henry Schlinger, Ph.D., BCBA-D - Prof. Psychology CAL State University Abby Martin - Journalist & Host "The Empire Files" Karen Hudes - Economist, Lawyer, World Bank Whistleblower Erin Ade - Reporter & Host "Boom Bust" – RT Paul Wright - Founder & Director of Human Rights Defense Center, Editor of Prison Legal News, Author Dylan Ratigan - Author & TV Host "The Dylan Ratigan Show" Mark Jacobson, Ph.D. - Prof. Civil & Env. Engineering, Stanford University. www.thesolutionsproject.org Erik Brynjolfsson, Ph.D. - Prof. of Management-MIT Sloan School of Management, Dir. MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, Author Lawrence M. Krauss, Ph.D. - Foundation Prof. School of Earth and Space Exploration, and director of Origins Project, Arizona State University. Author "A Universe from Nothing". Paul G. Hewitt - Author "Conceptual Physics" Roxanne Meadows - Co-Founder The Venus Project *special thanks also to Alexander "Obraz" ...Obraz.io who created the many 2d motion depictions (plus the sound fx!) of concepts such as the "hamburgers and fried chicken" segment and many others which are Alexander's inimitable work style and attention to details where we needed very specific illustrations of key points. The Venus Project proposes an alternative vision of what the future can be if we apply what we already know in order to achieve a sustainable new world civilization. It calls for a straightforward redesign of our culture in which the age-old inadequacies of war, poverty, hunger, debt and unnecessary human suffering are viewed not only as avoidable but as totally unacceptable. Anything less will result in a continuation of the same catalog of problems inherent in today's world. Learn more at http://www.thevenusproject.com Support/donate to the project: https://www.thevenusproject.com/donations/ Become a volunteer:https://www.thevenusproject.com/become-a-volunteer/
Просмотров: 2017599 The Venus Project
Arrow Season 3 - Katana Explained
 
07:07
Arrow Season 3 Katana New Characters Explained. Devin Aoki helps train Stephen Amell Oliver and Maseo Yamashiro. Batman villains and Comic Con 2014 ► http://bit.ly/AwesomeSubscribe Guardians Of The Galaxy Villains ► http://bit.ly/1xdELuj Arrow Season 3 Blue Beetle Harley Quinn ► http://bit.ly/1pKE3Ud YOU WILL LIKE THESE LINKS :) The Walking Dead Season 4 ► http://bit.ly/WalkingDeadVids Doctor Who Series 8 ► http://bit.ly/DoctorWhoSeries8 Game of Thrones Season 4 ► http://bit.ly/GameOfThronesSeason4 Sherlock Season 3 ► http://bit.ly/SherlockSeason3 Arrow Season 2 ► http://bit.ly/ArrowVids Emergency Anime Club ► http://bit.ly/AnimeClub Legend of Korra Book 3 ► http://bit.ly/LegendOfKorraBook3 Orphan Black Season 2 ► http://bit.ly/OrphanBlackSeason2 Ask Emergency Q&As ► http://bit.ly/QandA_Vids Attack On Titan Season 1 ► http://bit.ly/AttackOnTitanS1 Marvel TV Series and Movies ► http://bit.ly/MarvelVids New Emergency Awesome ► http://bit.ly/EmergencyAwesome :: FOLLOW ME :: Follow Me On Tumblr ► http://robotchallenger.com Follow Me On Facebook ► http://facebook.com/emergencyawesome Follow Me On Twitter ► http://twitter.com/awesomemergency Follow Me On Instagram ► http://instagram.com/emergencyawesome Wordpress Blog ► http://emergencyawesome.com THANKS FOR WATCHING!!
Просмотров: 75577 Emergency Awesome
Worn Stories Book Trailer
 
01:40
Worn Stories by Emily Spivack will be published by Princeton Architectural Press on August 26, 2014. Pre-order it now! http://bit.ly/VtGGNl Book trailer by: All Ages Productions http://allagesproductions.com Directed by: Ted Passon Produced by: David Dunn, Laris Kreslins Animation by: Andrew Jeffrey Wright and Harvey Benschoter Music by: Mary Lattimore and Jeff Zeigler (Thrill Jockey Records) Sound Mix/Mastering: David Downham and Gradwell Studios Special thanks to: Matt Joffe and Center City Film and Video, Giselle La Pompe-Moore, Alessandro Esculapio, and Diane Levinson Voice Talent: Andy Dinsmore, Brian Dwyer, Brian Langan, Carrie Collins, Dennis Spivack, Douglas Pensak, Emily Spivack, Harvey, Hillary Jay, Hillary Rea, James Doolittle, Jeremy Tannenbaum, Jessica Lennick, Julia Factorial, Karl Beyer, Lauren Spivack, Lou Tumolo, Mackenzie McAlpin, Maori Karmael Holmes, Marcy Spivack, Rose Luardo, Ted Passon, Tim Scammel, William Creeley About Worn Stories (http://wornstories.com): Everyone has a memoir in miniature in at least one piece of clothing. In Worn Stories, Emily Spivack has collected over sixty of these clothing-inspired narratives from cultural figures and talented storytellers. First-person accounts range from the everyday to the extraordinary, such as artist Marina Abramovic on the boots she wore to walk the Great Wall of China; musician Rosanne Cash on the purple shirt that belonged to her father; and fashion designer Cynthia Rowley on the Girl Scout sash that informed her business acumen. Other contributors include Greta Gerwig, Heidi Julavits, John Hodgman, Brandi Chastain, Andrew Tarlow, Piper Kerman, Maira Kalman, Sasha Frere-Jones, Rachel Comey, Jenna Wortham, Simon Doonan, Albert Maysles, Meghan O’Rourke, Susan Orlean, Andy Spade, Stephen Elliott, Paola Antonelli, David Carr, Andrew Kuo, Matt Wolf, Ariel Schrag, Marcus Samuelsson, Dapper Dan, Sherry Turkle, Brian Droitcour, Kenneth Goldsmith, and more. By turns funny, tragic, poignant, and celebratory, Worn Stories offers a revealing look at the clothes that protect us, serve as a uniform, assert our identity, or bring back the past—clothes that are encoded with the stories of our lives. Emily Spivack is a Brooklyn-based artist, writer, and editor who created the Smithsonian’s blog Threaded and collects stories for an Internet found-art project, Sentimental Value. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post.
Просмотров: 3474 Worn Stories
LAKE - No Wonder I     (as seen on Adventure Time)
 
03:10
If you like this song, please buy it at: http://laketheband.bandcamp.com/album/no-wonder-i LAKE's website: http://www.laketheband.com (from LAKE's last.fm entry:) "LAKE is based in Olympia, WA and Los Angeles. LAKE is a group of cloudy individuals brought together through lines drawn along Interstate-5, intersecting in Olympia around 2005. Since forming, they have gained and lost members, recorded 12 full length albums (only 3 of which have seen proper release), played across the world supporting such talented acts as Adrian Orange and Her Band, Half Handed Cloud, Laura Veirs, and Bonnie 'Prince' Billy. The sounds they craft are straight from the playbook of the good parts of Billy Joel, Fleetwood Mac, and Turkish psychedelic music. Caressing the Rhodes piano, endearing drum fills, guitars that don't sound like guitars, and some slamming bass lines: listening to LAKE is like pouring sugar in your ears. They'll turn your brain into chocolate, 67% cacao. Lake began as a Fleetwood Mac cover band with the intention of touring casinos around the Northwest and Alaska. A freak invitation from Karl Blau to record "original" material led to a reformation of the band and a whole new game plan. The members of Lake are also involved in other musical projects such as: Kickball, Palisades, live active cultures, Lindsey Schief, Ashley Eriksson, Swimming, Adam Oelsner, Your Heart Breaks, Cold Comfort Orchestra, Micah Davis-Wheeler, -a, and eli moore."
Просмотров: 875940 dethveggie
TRAVEL MOVIE | Backpacken op Bali & de Nusa Islands • Azië
 
02:06
Met Cathay Pacific zijn wij vanuit Nederland na een tussenstop op Hongkong naar Denpasar gevlogen op Bali. Het doel? 2 weken lang backpacken waarbij plekjes als Sanur en Canggu op de route lagen en de Nusa Islands net onder Bali. Wat we daar hebben gedaan? Onder andere een foto gemaakt voor de cover van het boek Backpack Bestemmingen! Verder hebben we de tofste plekken bezocht op de eilanden Nusa Penida, Nusa Lembongan én Nusa Ceningan. Hoe de hele trip was, dat zie je natuurlijk in de video maar check ook zeker onze artikelen over Indonesië op: https://www.wearetravellers.nl/tag/indonesie/ Check ook: We Are Travellers: http://www.wearetravellers.nl Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/wearetravellersnl Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wearetravellers.nl Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT9AvneGCWxJ91zbMTCTXdg Cathay Pacific: https://www.cathaypacific.com/ Wil je alle BALI blogs lezen? Je vindt ze hier: http://www.wearetravellers.nl/tag/INDONESIE/ Credits: Camera: Nikon D750 & Nikon D5600 https://www.wearetravellers.nl/azie/indonesie/paklijst-bali-meenemen-naar-bali/ Muziek: Song: SKANDR - Open Your Mind (Vlog No Copyright Music) Music promoted by Vlog No Copyright Music. Video Link: https://youtu.be/Oskc6f2SX2g
Просмотров: 5601 Roell de Ram
Our Miss Brooks: Magazine Articles / Cow in the Closet / Takes Over Spring Garden / Orphan Twins
 
01:51:34
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Просмотров: 68845 Remember This
Game of Thrones S6E04 Explained
 
11:36
Game of Thrones Season 6 Episode 4, “Book of the Stranger”, explained and analysed – what’s the beef between Melisandre and Davos and Brienne? Who is Yohn Royce? Is Tyrion making the right play in Meereen? What’s up with Jorah’s greyscale? What’s the High Sparrow up to in King’s Landing? What’s up with Theon? Seriously, can Ramsay please stop killing people now? And what’s the meaning of Daenerys’ Dothraki barbecue? Subscribe: http://bit.ly/1NtFJuf Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alt-Shift-X/300119650155615 Twitter: https://twitter.com/AltShiftX Tumblr: http://altshiftx.tumblr.com/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/AltShiftX Translate captions: https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/6054623 Created with Adobe After Effects and a Blue Yeti USB microphone. Images and video from Game of Thrones are the property of their creators, used here under fair use. Thanks to the following Patrons: Reverend Xandria, @MrFifaSA, Cameron Weiss, @Vineyarddawg, Kate Lyons, Ryan Steele, Michael Appell, Patrick Rennie, Matthew Elisha Williams, Fred Petty, Jason Rattray.
Просмотров: 857117 Alt Shift X
Jacque Fresco - What the Future Holds Beyond 2000 - Nichols College (1999)
 
01:05:02
Jacque Fresco's introduction lecture at Nichols College. (1999-02-02) http://www.thevenusproject.com Embedding & sharing is highly encouraged. Note: This LTI Repository location contains only "official", fully proofread versions of the transcript & its derived translations. More translations will be added as they are completed. If your language is not yet represented here, consider helping these efforts by joining your language team at http://bit.ly/Zj0QWC (LTI Forum).
Просмотров: 4515 Linguistic Team International
interzum 2017
 
00:48
Eindrücke von dem ersten Messetag der interzum 2017.
Просмотров: 3972 Koelnmesse Neuemedien
Die verliebte Firma (1932), Director: Max Ophüls (English, Deutsch Subtitles)
 
01:02:14
Die verliebte Firma was Max Ophüls' first feature film. The story follows a movie crew who is filming a musical in a small and idyllic alpine village. After their temperamental leading lady drops out of the film, they decide to replace her with the village's young post office clerk Gretl, who returns to Berlin with them. There she has to struggle with the movie's all-male crew, who all try to woo and win her. Directed by Max Ophüls Writing Credits (in alphabetical order) Bruno Granichstaedten ... (story) Ernst Marischka ... (story) Fritz Zeckendorf Cast (in credits order) Gustav Fröhlich ... Werner Loring jr. - stellvertr. Direktor der Ideal Tonfilm Anny Ahlers ... Peggy Barling - Filmstar Lien Deyers ... Gretl Krummbichler - Postbeamtin Ernö Verebes ... Heinrich Pulver - Regieassist. (as Ernst Verebes) José Wedorn ... Leo Lamberti - Kammersänger Leonard Steckel ... Harry Bing - Regisseur Hubert von Meyerinck ... Fritz Willner - Filmautor Fritz Steiner ... Toni Bauer - Komponist Hermann Krehan ... Karl Martini - Filmoperateur Werner Finck ... Franz Klingemüller - Postvorstand
Просмотров: 1357 Max Ophuls
You Bet Your Life: Secret Word - Chair / People / Foot
 
01:27:23
Julius Henry "Groucho" Marx (October 2, 1890 -- August 19, 1977) was an American comedian and film and television star. He is known as a master of quick wit and widely considered one of the best comedians of the modern era. His rapid-fire, often impromptu delivery of innuendo-laden patter earned him many admirers and imitators. He made 13 feature films with his siblings the Marx Brothers, of whom he was the third-born. He also had a successful solo career, most notably as the host of the radio and television game show You Bet Your Life. His distinctive appearance, carried over from his days in vaudeville, included quirks such as an exaggerated stooped posture, glasses, cigar, and a thick greasepaint mustache and eyebrows. These exaggerated features resulted in the creation of one of the world's most ubiquitous and recognizable novelty disguises, known as "Groucho glasses", a one-piece mask consisting of horn-rimmed glasses, large plastic nose, bushy eyebrows and mustache. Groucho Marx was, and is, the most recognizable and well-known of the Marx Brothers. Groucho-like characters and references have appeared in popular culture both during and after his life, some aimed at audiences who may never have seen a Marx Brothers movie. Groucho's trademark eye glasses, nose, mustache, and cigar have become icons of comedy—glasses with fake noses and mustaches (referred to as "Groucho glasses", "nose-glasses," and other names) are sold by novelty and costume shops around the world. Nat Perrin, close friend of Groucho Marx and writer of several Marx Brothers films, inspired John Astin's portrayal of Gomez Addams on the 1960s TV series The Addams Family with similarly thick mustache, eyebrows, sardonic remarks, backward logic, and ever-present cigar (pulled from his breast pocket already lit). Alan Alda often vamped in the manner of Groucho on M*A*S*H. In one episode, "Yankee Doodle Doctor", Hawkeye and Trapper put on a Marx Brothers act at the 4077, with Hawkeye playing Groucho and Trapper playing Harpo. In three other episodes, a character appeared who was named Captain Calvin Spalding (played by Loudon Wainwright III). Groucho's character in Animal Crackers was Captain Geoffrey T. Spaulding. On many occasions, on the 1970s television sitcom All In The Family, Michael Stivic (Rob Reiner), would briefly imitate Groucho Marx and his mannerisms. Two albums by British rock band Queen, A Night at the Opera (1975) and A Day at the Races (1976), are named after Marx Brothers films. In March 1977, Groucho invited Queen to visit him in his Los Angeles home; there they performed "'39" a capella. A long-running ad campaign for Vlasic Pickles features an animated stork that imitates Groucho's mannerisms and voice. On the famous Hollywood Sign in California, one of the "O"s is dedicated to Groucho. Alice Cooper contributed over $27,000 to remodel the sign, in memory of his friend. In 1982, Gabe Kaplan portrayed Marx in the film Groucho, in a one-man stage production. He also imitated Marx occasionally on his previous TV sitcom Welcome Back, Kotter. Actor Frank Ferrante has performed as Groucho Marx on stage for more than two decades. He continues to tour under rights granted by the Marx family in a one-man show entitled An Evening With Groucho in theaters throughout the United States and Canada with piano accompanist Jim Furmston. In the late 1980s Ferrante starred as Groucho in the off-Broadway and London show Groucho: A Life in Revue penned by Groucho's son Arthur. Ferrante portrayed the comedian from age 15 to 85. The show was later filmed for PBS in 2001. Woody Allen's 1996 musical Everyone Says I Love You, in addition to being named for one of Groucho's signature songs, ends with a Groucho-themed New Year's Eve party in Paris, which some of the stars, including Allen and Goldie Hawn, attend in full Groucho costume. The highlight of the scene is an ensemble song-and-dance performance of "Hooray for Captain Spaulding"—done entirely in French. In the last of the Tintin comics, Tintin and the Picaros, a balloon shaped like the face of Groucho could be seen in the Annual Carnival. In the Italian horror comic Dylan Dog, the protagonist's sidekick is a Groucho impersonator whose character became his permanent personality. The BBC remade the radio sitcom Flywheel, Shyster and Flywheel, with contemporary actors playing the parts of the original cast. The series was repeated on digital radio station BBC7. Scottish playwright Louise Oliver wrote a play named Waiting For Groucho about Chico and Harpo waiting for Groucho to turn up for the filming of their last project together. This was performed by Glasgow theatre company Rhymes with Purple Productions at the Edinburgh Fringe and in Glasgow and Hamilton in 2007-08. Groucho was played by Scottish actor Frodo McDaniel. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groucho
Просмотров: 66178 Remember This
The Vietnam War: Reasons for Failure - Why the U.S. Lost
 
01:45:58
In the post-war era, Americans struggled to absorb the lessons of the military intervention. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0871137992/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0871137992&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=d1bb53399f448906b40e7c954de052ac As General Maxwell Taylor, one of the principal architects of the war, noted, "First, we didn't know ourselves. We thought that we were going into another Korean War, but this was a different country. Secondly, we didn't know our South Vietnamese allies... And we knew less about North Vietnam. Who was Ho Chi Minh? Nobody really knew. So, until we know the enemy and know our allies and know ourselves, we'd better keep out of this kind of dirty business. It's very dangerous." Some have suggested that "the responsibility for the ultimate failure of this policy [America's withdrawal from Vietnam] lies not with the men who fought, but with those in Congress..." Alternatively, the official history of the United States Army noted that "tactics have often seemed to exist apart from larger issues, strategies, and objectives. Yet in Vietnam the Army experienced tactical success and strategic failure... The...Vietnam War...legacy may be the lesson that unique historical, political, cultural, and social factors always impinge on the military...Success rests not only on military progress but on correctly analyzing the nature of the particular conflict, understanding the enemy's strategy, and assessing the strengths and weaknesses of allies. A new humility and a new sophistication may form the best parts of a complex heritage left to the Army by the long, bitter war in Vietnam." U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger wrote in a secret memo to President Gerald Ford that "in terms of military tactics, we cannot help draw the conclusion that our armed forces are not suited to this kind of war. Even the Special Forces who had been designed for it could not prevail." Even Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara concluded that "the achievement of a military victory by U.S. forces in Vietnam was indeed a dangerous illusion." Doubts surfaced as to the effectiveness of large-scale, sustained bombing. As Army Chief of Staff Harold Keith Johnson noted, "if anything came out of Vietnam, it was that air power couldn't do the job." Even General William Westmoreland admitted that the bombing had been ineffective. As he remarked, "I still doubt that the North Vietnamese would have relented." The inability to bomb Hanoi to the bargaining table also illustrated another U.S. miscalculation. The North's leadership was composed of hardened communists who had been fighting for independence for thirty years. They had defeated the French, and their tenacity as both nationalists and communists was formidable. Ho Chi Minh is quoted as saying, "You can kill ten of my men for every one I kill of yours...But even at these odds you will lose and I will win." The Vietnam War called into question the U.S. Army doctrine. Marine Corps General Victor H. Krulak heavily criticised Westmoreland's attrition strategy, calling it "wasteful of American lives... with small likelihood of a successful outcome." In addition, doubts surfaced about the ability of the military to train foreign forces. Between 1965 and 1975, the United States spent $111 billion on the war ($686 billion in FY2008 dollars). This resulted in a large federal budget deficit. More than 3 million Americans served in the Vietnam War, some 1.5 million of whom actually saw combat in Vietnam. James E. Westheider wrote that "At the height of American involvement in 1968, for example, there were 543,000 American military personnel in Vietnam, but only 80,000 were considered combat troops." Conscription in the United States had been controlled by the President since World War II, but ended in 1973." By war's end, 58,220 American soldiers had been killed, more than 150,000 had been wounded, and at least 21,000 had been permanently disabled. According to Dale Kueter, "Sixty-one percent of those killed were age 21 or younger. Of those killed in combat, 86.3 percent were white, 12.5 percent were black and the remainder from other races." The youngest American KIA in the war was PFC Dan Bullock, who had falsified his birth certificate and enlisted in the US Marines at age 14 and who was killed in combat at age 15. Approximately 830,000 Vietnam veterans suffered symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. An estimated 125,000 Americans fled to Canada to avoid the Vietnam draft, and approximately 50,000 American servicemen deserted. In 1977, United States President Jimmy Carter granted a full, complete and unconditional pardon to all Vietnam-era draft dodgers. The Vietnam War POW/MIA issue, concerning the fate of U.S. service personnel listed as missing in action, persisted for many years after the war's conclusion. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_War
Просмотров: 3980827 The Film Archives
Suspense: Beyond Good and Evil / Summer Storm / A Shroud for Sara
 
01:24:10
The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29
Просмотров: 25049 Remember This
The Groucho Marx Show: American Television Quiz Show - Wall / Water Episodes
 
52:07
In public and off-camera, Harpo and Chico were difficult to recognize by their fans without their wigs and costumes, but it was almost impossible to recognize Groucho without his trademark eye-glasses, fake eyebrows and mustache. More Groucho: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=f120ebf09140f991af662ca585bd141f&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=dvd&keywords=groucho The greasepaint mustache and eyebrows originated spontaneously prior to a vaudeville performance in the early 1920s when he did not have time to apply the pasted-on mustache he had been using (or, according to his autobiography, simply did not enjoy the removal of the mustache every night because of the effects of tearing an adhesive bandage off the same patch of skin every night). After applying the greasepaint mustache, a quick glance in the mirror revealed his natural hair eyebrows were too undertoned and did not match the rest of his face, so Marx added the greasepaint to his eyebrows and headed for the stage. The absurdity of the greasepaint was never discussed on-screen, but in a famous scene in Duck Soup, where both Chicolini (Chico) and Pinky (Harpo) disguise themselves as Groucho, they are briefly seen applying the greasepaint, implicitly answering any question a viewer might have had about where he got his mustache and eyebrows. Marx was asked to apply the greasepaint mustache once more for You Bet Your Life when it came to television, but he refused, opting instead to grow a real one, which he wore for the rest of his life. By this time, his eyesight had weakened enough for him actually to need corrective lenses; before then, his eye-glasses had merely been a stage prop. He debuted this new, and now much-older, appearance in Love Happy, the Marx Brothers's last film as a comedy team. He did paint the old character mustache over his real one on a few rare performing occasions, including a TV sketch with Jackie Gleason on the latter's variety show in the 1960s (in which they performed a variation on the song "Mister Gallagher and Mister Shean," co-written by Marx's uncle Al Shean) and the 1968 Otto Preminger film Skidoo. In his late 70s at the time, Marx remarked on his appearance: "I looked like I was embalmed." He played a mob boss called "God" and, according to Marx, "both my performance and the film were God-awful!". The exaggerated walk, with one hand on the small of his back and his torso bent almost 90 degrees at the waist was a parody of a fad from the 1880s and 1890s. Fashionable young men of the upper classes would affect a walk with their right hand held fast to the base of their spines, and with a slight lean forward at the waist and a very slight twist toward the right with the left shoulder, allowing the left hand to swing free with the gait. Edmund Morris, in his biography The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt, describes a young Roosevelt, newly elected to the State Assembly, walking into the House Chamber for the first time in this trendy, affected gait, somewhat to the amusement of the older and more rural Members who were present. Groucho exaggerated this fad to a marked degree, and the comedy effect was enhanced by how out of date the fashion was by the 1940s and 1950s. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groucho_marx
Просмотров: 89709 The Film Archives
Ostern in Bolivien - Easter Eggs  in Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands | Ubisoft-TV [DE]
 
02:19
Spuckende Lamas, seltsame Knöpfe in der Umgebung und Besuch aus der Matrix! Im riesigen Bolivien von Ghost Recon Wildlands werden aufmerksame Spieler mit allerlei Easter Eggs belohnt. Bei uns seht ihr ein paar davon, doch habt ihr sicher selber schon eine Menge Geheimnisse entdeckt. Schreibt uns bis zum 29. März die von euch entdeckten Easter Eggs in die Kommentare und gewinnt das im Video gezeigt Fan-Paket von Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands. Viel Erfolg SCHÖNE FAKTEN: Erhältlich seit dem 07.03.2017 für PC, PS4 und Xbox One. HIER VORBESTELLEN: ► http://ubi.li/ykxga - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - PLAYLIST MIT ALLEN VIDEOS ZUM SPIEL: ► https://goo.gl/6w9GVu - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - FOLGT UNS: ► Offizielle Webseite: http://www.ghostrecon.com ► YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/UbisoftTV ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/GhostRecon ► Instagram http://instagram.com/ubisoftde ► Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/ubisoftde ► Twitch: http://www.twitch.tv/ubisoftde ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GhostReconDE/ ► Mehr von Ubisoft gibt es unter: http://www.ubisoft.com
Просмотров: 11696 UbisoftDE | UbisoftTV
My Friend Irma: Acute Love Sickness / Bon Voyage / Irma Wants to Join Club
 
01:29:04
My Friend Irma, created by writer-director-producer Cy Howard, is a top-rated, long-run radio situation comedy, so popular in the late 1940s that its success escalated to films, television, a comic strip and a comic book, while Howard scored with another radio comedy hit, Life with Luigi. Marie Wilson portrayed the title character, Irma Peterson, on radio, in two films and a television series. The radio series was broadcast from April 11, 1947 to August 23, 1954. Dependable, level-headed Jane Stacy (Cathy Lewis, Diana Lynn) began each weekly radio program by narrating a misadventure of her innocent, bewildered roommate, Irma, a dim-bulb stenographer from Minnesota. The two central characters were in their mid-twenties. Irma had her 25th birthday in one episode; she was born on May 5. After the two met in the first episode, they lived together in an apartment rented from their Irish landlady, Mrs. O'Reilly (Jane Morgan, Gloria Gordon). Irma's boyfriend Al (John Brown) was a deadbeat, barely on the right side of the law, who had not held a job in years. Only someone like Irma could love Al, whose nickname for Irma was "Chicken". Al had many crazy get-rich-quick schemes, which never worked. Al planned to marry Irma at some future date so she could support him. Professor Kropotkin (Hans Conried), the Russian violinist at the Princess Burlesque theater, lived upstairs. He greeted Jane and Irma with remarks like, "My two little bunnies with one being an Easter bunny and the other being Bugs Bunny." The Professor insulted Mrs. O'Reilly, complained about his room and reluctantly became O'Reilly's love interest in an effort to make her forget his back rent. Irma worked for the lawyer, Mr. Clyde (Alan Reed). She had such an odd filing system that once when Clyde fired her, he had to hire her back again because he couldn't find anything. Useless at dictation, Irma mangled whatever Clyde dictated. Asked how long she had been with Clyde, Irma said, "When I first went to work with him he had curly black hair, then it got grey, and now it's snow white. I guess I've been with him about six months." Irma became less bright as the program evolved. She also developed a tendency to whine or cry whenever something went wrong, which was at least once every show. Jane had a romantic inclination for her boss, millionaire Richard Rhinelander (Leif Erickson), but he had no real interest in her. Another actor in the show was Bea Benaderet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Friend_Irma_%28radio-TV%29 Katherine Elisabeth Wilson (August 19, 1916 -- November 23, 1972), better known by her stage name, Marie Wilson, was an American radio, film, and television actress. She may be best remembered as the title character in My Friend Irma. Born in Anaheim, California, Wilson began her career in New York City as a dancer on the Broadway stage. She gained national prominence with My Friend Irma on radio, television and film. The show made her a star but typecast her almost interminably as the quintessential dumb blonde, which she played in numerous comedies and in Ken Murray's famous Hollywood "Blackouts". During World War II, she was a volunteer performer at the Hollywood Canteen. She was also a popular wartime pin-up. Wilson's performance in Satan Met a Lady, the second film adaptation of Dashiell Hammett's detective novel The Maltese Falcon, is a virtual template for Marilyn Monroe's later onscreen persona. Wilson appeared in more than 40 films and was a guest on The Ed Sullivan Show on four occasions. She was a television performer during the 1960s, working until her untimely death. Wilson's talents have been recognized with three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame: for radio at 6301 Hollywood Boulevard, for television at 6765 Hollywood Boulevard and for movies at 6601 Hollywood Boulevard. Wilson married four times: Nick Grinde (early 1930s), LA golf pro Bob Stevens (1938--39), Allan Nixon (1942--50) and Robert Fallon (1951--72). She died of cancer in 1972 at age 56 and was interred in the Columbarium of Remembrance at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Hollywood Hills. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Wilson_%28American_actress%29
Просмотров: 257013 Remember This
Suspense: After Dinner Story / Statement of Employee Henry Wilson / Cabin B-13
 
01:29:32
In the earliest years, the program was hosted by "The Man in Black" (played by Joseph Kearns or Ted Osborne) with many episodes written or adapted by the prominent mystery author John Dickson Carr. One of the series' earliest successes and its single most popular episode is Lucille Fletcher's "Sorry, Wrong Number," about a bedridden woman (Agnes Moorehead) who panics after overhearing a murder plot on a crossed telephone connection but is unable to persuade anyone to investigate. First broadcast on May 25, 1943, it was restaged seven times (last on February 14, 1960) — each time with Moorehead. The popularity of the episode led to a film adaptation, Sorry, Wrong Number (1948), starring Barbara Stanwyck. Nominated for an Academy Award for her performance, Stanwyck recreated the role on Lux Radio Theater. Loni Anderson had the lead in the TV movie Sorry, Wrong Number (1989). Another notable early episode was Fletcher's "The Hitch Hiker," in which a motorist (Orson Welles) is stalked on a cross-country trip by a nondescript man who keeps appearing on the side of the road. This episode originally aired on September 2, 1942, and was later adapted for television by Rod Serling as a 1960 episode of The Twilight Zone. After the network sustained the program during its first two years, the sponsor became Roma Wines (1944--1947), and then (after another brief period of sustained hour-long episodes, initially featuring Robert Montgomery as host and "producer" in early 1948), Autolite Spark Plugs (1948--1954); eventually Harlow Wilcox (of Fibber McGee and Molly) became the pitchman. William Spier, Norman MacDonnell and Anton M. Leader were among the producers and directors. The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29
Просмотров: 55851 Remember This
Our Miss Brooks: English Test / First Aid Course / Tries to Forget / Wins a Man's Suit
 
01:47:30
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Просмотров: 73987 Remember This
Calling All Cars: The Corpse Without a Face / Bull in the China Shop / Young Dillinger
 
01:27:36
The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the police department of the city of Los Angeles, California. The LAPD has been copiously fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racial animosity, police brutality and police corruption. The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Просмотров: 43779 Remember This
The Great Gildersleeve: The Houseboat / Houseboat Vacation / Marjorie Is Expecting
 
01:29:30
Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Gildersleeve
Просмотров: 107928 Remember This
Calling All Cars: Muerta en Buenaventura / The Greasy Trail / Turtle-Necked Murder
 
01:28:22
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Просмотров: 235557 Remember This
Calling All Cars: History of Dallas Eagan / Homicidal Hobo / The Drunken Sailor
 
01:28:24
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Просмотров: 195034 Remember This
Calling All Cars: Gold in Them Hills / Woman with the Stone Heart / Reefers by the Acre
 
01:27:51
The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the police department of the city of Los Angeles, California. The LAPD has been copiously fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racial animosity, police brutality and police corruption. The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Просмотров: 44966 Remember This
The Great Gildersleeve: Gildy Meets Nurse Milford / Double Date with Marjorie / The Expectant Father
 
01:29:30
Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Gildersleeve
Просмотров: 83258 Remember This
Calling All Cars: Ghost House / Death Under the Saquaw / The Match Burglar
 
01:27:24
The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the police department of the city of Los Angeles, California. The LAPD has been copiously fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racial animosity, police brutality and police corruption. The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Просмотров: 52440 Remember This
Suspense: The Lodger
 
01:03:58
Often the two overlap. However, pure crime films/novels focus on a specific crime or set of crimes, and solving the mystery or tracking down the criminal(s), with no or little violence but more drama throughout. Thrillers are usually fiction-based and fast in pace, while crime fiction tend to be more leisurely paced, dramatic and realistic. Generally, violence is also lacking in a crime fiction, but this depends if the work is based on the mafia, where violence is intense.[17] Some crime films showcase more on the gangster life, personal drama of the criminals and even their biographical film (i.e., The Godfather). Crime-thrillers, on the other hand, have more threat and suspense in them and may involve espionage (spying), frequent killings and other non-criminal conflicts (i.e., Heat). Unlike crime thrillers, crime films usually offer a more serious, grim and realistic portrayal of the criminal environment, emphasizing character development and complex narratives over suspense sequences, chase scenes and violence.[18] In crime fiction, the hero might be a police officer, or a private eye, who can still be tough and resourceful. He is pitted against villains determined to destroy him, although, unlike in thrillers, not necessarily other people, the country or the stability of the free world. Unlike in crime fiction, thrillers keep the emphasis away from the gangster, melodrama or the detective in the crime-related plot, and rather focus more on the suspense and danger that is generated. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thriller_%28genre%29
Просмотров: 53184 Remember This
NYSTV - Reptilians and the Bloodline of Kings - Midnight Ride w David Carrico  Multi Language
 
02:03:40
Reptilians have been around for a while. Queztol Quatal was the feathered serpent that led the meso American Empires for example. So the main prevailing theory on reptilians is that they are seraphim angels who, because they lost the grace of God, lost their angelic forms and changed into what we know today as reptilians. Seraphim actually means fiery serpent. These fallen angels reinvented themselves as the gods of old. Poiseden, Zeus, Shiva, Baal, Zoraster, etc... and ruled openly as gods for a thousand years. Then they went underground, starting multinational corporations and are ready to reemerge publicly in their new reinvention of themselves, our alien saviours. Fallen Angels to False gods to aliens. That pretty much sums up world history. (something interesting I found out is that every language has a word for reptilian). Join Jon Pounders and David Carrico as they talk about subjects only found at NYSTV. More videos added everyday so subscribe! Free Truth Productions Cause lies are such a total waste of time. www.freetruthproductions.com Languages Afrikaans አማርኛ العربية Azərbaycanca / آذربايجان Boarisch Беларуская Български বাংলা བོད་ཡིག / Bod skad Bosanski Català Нохчийн Sinugboanong Binisaya ᏣᎳᎩ Corsu Nehiyaw Česky словѣньскъ / slověnĭskŭ Cymraeg Dansk Deutsch Ελληνικά Esperanto Español Eesti Euskara فارسی Suomi Võro Français Frysk Gàidhlig Galego Avañe'ẽ ગુજરાતી هَوُسَ Hawai`i עברית हिन्दी Hrvatski Krèyol ayisyen Magyar Հայերեն Bahasa Indonesia Igbo Ido Íslenska Italiano 日本語 Basa Jawa ქართული Қазақша ភាសាខ្មែរ ಕನ್ನಡ 한국어 Kurdî / كوردی Коми Kırgızca / Кыргызча Latina Lëtzebuergesch ລາວ / Pha xa lao Lazuri / ლაზური Lietuvių Latviešu Malagasy 官話/官话 Māori Македонски മലയാളം Монгол Moldovenească मराठी Bahasa Melayu bil-Malti Myanmasa नेपाली Nederlands Norsk (bokmål / riksmål) Diné bizaad Chi-Chewa ਪੰਜਾਬੀ / पंजाबी / پنجابي Norfuk Polski پښتو Português Romani / रोमानी Kirundi Română Русский संस्कृतम् Sicilianu सिनधि Srpskohrvatski / Српскохрватски සිංහල Slovenčina Slovenščina Gagana Samoa chiShona Soomaaliga Shqip Српски Sesotho Basa Sunda Svenska Kiswahili தமிழ் తెలుగు Тоҷикӣ ไทย / Phasa Thai Tagalog Lea Faka-Tonga Türkçe Reo Mā`ohi Українська اردو Ўзбек Việtnam Хальмг isiXhosa ייִדיש Yorùbá 中文 isiZulu ‪中文(台灣)‬ tokipona
Просмотров: 133 Free Truth Productions