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Social exclusion (segregation and social isolation) | Social Inequality | MCAT | Khan Academy
 
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Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/healthcare-and-medicine) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat) for MCAT related content. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Created by Arshya Vahabzadeh. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/social-inequality/social-class/v/environmental-justice?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/social-inequality/social-class/v/social-reproduction?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat MCAT on Khan Academy: Go ahead and practice some passage-based questions! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s MCAT channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDkK5wqSuwDlJ3_nl3rgdiQ?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Просмотров: 73048 khanacademymedicine
Presentation on Gender Discrimination By Beautiful Blaster
 
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ADMEC Multimedia Celebrated Annual Design Competion 2015 on 27th Oct, 2015. for more infomation: http://www.admecindia.co.in/
Просмотров: 5466 ADMEC Rohini
Zara Rahman: Data and discrimination: representing marginalised communities in data
 
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https://media.ccc.de/browse/conferences/camp2015/camp2015-6876-data_and_discrimination_representing_marginalised_communities_in_data.html In the past, marginalised communities have often been left uncounted when it comes to institutional datasets. Some argue that the right to be counted is a crucial step to addressing the needs of marginalised communities; but for others, the exact opposite is true. Anonymity and not being reflected in data is exactly what some communities want, and need. In this talk, I'll discuss both sides of the argument, with concrete examples of how the different strategies have been used in various situations. Zara Rahman
Просмотров: 138 media.ccc.de
Why Women Are Marginalized (& Male Responsibility)
 
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I talk about marginalization, religious attitudes, and abortion during this discussion. Women are oppressed, because men suppress the need to engage and understand their own emotional, psychological, and spiritual state, and relate that state to the whole of society and the world. Video transcript here: http://heartknowledge777.com/archives/1179
Просмотров: 371 HeartKnowledge777
Web Serial - Discrimination against Women in Latin America
 
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Today's edition of Web Serial looks at discrimination against women in several countries of Latin America. It begins with a report from Paraguay on how indigenous women, the poorest of the poor, are taking the leadership in their communities in the fight against poverty and marginalization. Then an account of the plight of female domestic workers in Peru, where 75% of such women do not have health insurance and 80% earn less than the minimum wage. This is followed by a story on women workers at the Honduran electricity company and the discrimination they face, from the company and at times from male colleagues. Finally, we have a report on gender violence in Paraguay, where 70% of women report being victims of such abuse, while the country still has no laws that address the problem. teleSUR http://multimedia.telesurtv.net/v/web-serial-336049/
Просмотров: 229 TeleSUR English
Combating Prejudice with Art | Abdul Abdullah | TEDxYouth@Sydney
 
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As the son of a sixth-generation Australian and a Malaysian Muslim, Abdul Abdullah offers a unique perspective into ideas about contemporary Australian culture and what it means to be a young Australian Muslim today. Here Abdul shows and explains his amazing photographic art. He says: "In my talk I spoke about personal experiences growing up as a Muslim in Australia, and how I feel my identity has been politicised. I spoke about how the events of 9/11 and the War of Terror effected my family and my understanding and relationship with the world. These experiences influenced how I make art and how I use my practice as a vehicle for effecting positive change. Domestically I feel a move towards jingoism has given rise to events like the Cronulla riots, the Reclaim Australia movement and a general anti-Islam sentiment. These divisive attitudes and actions act as obstacles to any real sense of belonging or commonality, leaving segments of the community marginalised and disaffected." Abdul Abdullah is an artist from Perth whose practice explores the identity and experience of marginalised members of the Australian community. His works are driven by symbolism and personal experience. He has been the recipient of various grants and awards including the Blake Prize for Human Justice in 2011 and most recently, he was named finalist in the Archibald Prize for his portrait of artist and activist Richard Bell. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Просмотров: 5463 TEDx Talks
Gender Marginalization - Desktop Documentary
 
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Просмотров: 211 Logan Mithuen
Fiona: for women in "${tech[@]}"; do
 
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https://media.ccc.de/browse/conferences/camp2015/camp2015-6774-for_women_in_tech_do.html The lack of women in tech is evident in numbers and our experience. This imbalance has been in the focus of a public discussion, that has become increasingly difficult to follow and fueled by false accusations or false. So let's get together and try to understand what the underlying reasons are and what we can do to create a change. And most importantly ask ourselves: Why should we care? Fiona
Просмотров: 1041 media.ccc.de
Gender stereotyping in India becoming a threat to women's safety?
 
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On Hum Log, a discussion on the tendency of the society to form gender stereotypes and treat people who break the norm as mock-worthy. The lawyers of the accused in the 2012 Delhi gang rape of a 23-year-old physiotherapy student were seen blaming the victim for violating what they believed were characteristics of an ideal woman. We ask – should we continue to give role definitions for men and women and teach that to young minds? (Audio in Hindi) Watch full show: http://www.ndtv.com/video/player/hum-log/video-story/359142?yt
Просмотров: 1401 NDTV
Newsroom: A controversial policy to endorse the decriminalisation of the sex trade
 
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Sex workers around the world continue to face stigma, discrimination, violence including marginalisation and a lack of adequate health services something which amnesty international is hoping to change. Last week the humanitarian organization approved a controversial policy to endorse the decriminalisation of the sex trade, but the decision has been met with different views, with most feminist and woman rights groups saying the policy will give legitimacy to pimps and brothel owners, and allow the sex industry to thrive. From our studios in Cape Town we are joined by Soraya Mentoor who is the Advocacy and Campaigns Coordinator from Embrace Dignity. For more News visit: http://www.sabc.co.za/news Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SABCNewsOnline?lang=en Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SABCNewsOnline
Просмотров: 91 SABC Digital News
Prof. Sreedhara.V.S - LITERARY REPRESENTATIONS AND EXPERIENCES OF DISCRIMINATION
 
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Prof. Sreedhara.V.S , Member, People's Democratic Forum, Bengaluru SESSION-II LITERARY REPRESENTATIONS AND EXPERIENCES OF DISCRIMINATION - REFLECTIONS ON AFRO-AMERICAN & DALIT TEXTS Dalits and African-Americans in 21st Century: Learning from Cross-Cultural Experiences Organized by Centre for Study of Social Exclusion and Inclusive Policies (CSSEIP) & Dr. Ambedkar Studies Centre National Law School of India University (NLSIU), Bengaluru Sponsored by Indian Council For Social Science Research (ICSSR), New Delhi This seminar is proposed to bring scholars from USA and India to discuss and share their expertise and learning focused on understanding caste and race from critical perspective. The purpose of the conference is therefore to engage in cross-cultural discussions about the similarities and differences between the African-Americans in USA and the Dalits in India with regard to their experiences of exclusion and discrimination, marginalization and exploitation and threat to their life itself, and that it would provide the participants of both USA and India with invaluable insights in understanding such realities that the two countries are faced with today.
Uncovering the Gendered Dynamics in Global Affairs: Peace, Development, and Human Rights Beyond 2015
 
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On Thursday, September 24th, 2015, the NYU-SPS Center for Global Affairs hosted an event in celebration of the launch of its Global Gender concentration as a part of its M.S. in Global Affairs program. Event Description: Join the Center for Global Affairs in celebrating the launch of a new concentration in global gender studies and discussing the impact of current international crises on women – and the relationship between peaceful societies and gender equality. Issues to be examined include: **Quantifying women’s contribution to the global economy (in ways sometimes not recognized in the formal economy) - and how does workplace discrimination against and marginalization of women contribute to financial instability and crisis? How will trends toward austerity affect women in developing economies? **What has been the impact of ISIS on women's security in the region? How will Yazidi women re-integrate into their societies after escaping ISIS? What is the forecast for women affected by the largest refugee crisis since World War II? **Could sexual exploitation by peacekeeping forces in the Central African Republic (and elsewhere) have been prevented - and how can peacekeeping credibly move forward? **As we move into an election year that may include a female candidate for U.S. president, what is the outlook for women as political leaders? Are women changing politics or perpetuating old models of leadership? Moderator: Nermeen Shaikh, co-producer and cohost, Democracy Now! Panelists: Anne Marie Goetz, Clinical Professor, Center for Global Affairs; former Chief Advisor on Peace and Security, UN Women Shahrashoub Razavi, Chief, Research and Data Section, UN Women; former Research Coordinator on Gender, UNRISD Dubravka Šimonović, United Nations Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women
FORSAKEN NORTH- Documentary inside Most ’Marginalised’ Regions in Kenya #52YearsofSufferinginNEP
 
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Surveying a history of marginalisation and distance from government support, Yussuf A Korow, Kenya freelance journalist explores the legal and administrative impediments to have plagued the development of the region of Northern Kenya. Citing a litany of human rights abuses and the discrimination faced by inhabitants of the region, An insightful glimpse in to the deplorable state of affairs in the forsaken north. The harrowing tell of stories in NE Kenya, Despite the many achievements of the past 52 years, Kenyans and especially the residents of the north eastern counties of Garissa, Wajir and Mandera view this current threat to nationhood as the most serious yet they have faced since independence.We explore The inside narrative. .............................................................................. ......................................................................................... Join Us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/ABDIASKARITUBE Follow us on twitter @ https://twitter.com/ABDIASKARITUBE Email: abdiaskaritube@gmail.com ………………………………………………… Our Larger Channel …https://www.youtube.com/user/joorre123 Our new Channel …. https://www.youtube.com/user/ABDIASKARIMEDIA
Просмотров: 3228 ABDI ASKARI TUBE
🇮🇳 Dalit Muslims of India | Al Jazeera World
 
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For centuries India's social structure was built around a rigid Hindu caste system. While the caste system was constitutionally abolished in 1950, its legacy still deeply affects contemporary Indian society. The Hindu population, around 84 percent of the 1.2 billion people that live in the country, is still influenced by the four main traditional castes, which also have their own sub-sects: Brahmins, the priestly and academic class; Kshatriya, the warrior caste; Vaishya, which comprises the business community; and Shudra, the working class. Outside these four groups are others, including the Dalits, who are at the bottom of the hierarchy. Dalits have traditionally done jobs considered ritually impure, like garbage collection, street sweeping, the cremation of dead bodies and the disposal of human waste. With Dalits continuing to face prejudice and discrimination within their own communities, some try to find social acceptance by converting to Buddhism, Christianity, Sikhism or Islam. "It bothers me whenever I introduce myself. People ask about my surname," says Rakesh, who's a dhobi, the washerman caste. Rakesh has converted to Islam and changed his name to Ali Kanojia. "I tell them my name is Rakesh. They ask, 'Rakesh what?' They normally ask you this at a Hindu's house," he says. But conversion is not simply a way out - prejudices still carry over into other religions. Many converts face resistance and even violence from their families or the communities they were born into and the new chosen faith can pose a different set of challenges - like those faced by Ali Kanojia from his own family. "It's not easy to convert to Islam," he says. "They [the family] say it's not right. I ask, Why? They say it's because Muslims have a bad reputation." Abdulrahman Bharti's conversion to Islam almost cost him his life. "I got shot by Hindu people from the Sawar clan ... . When a person converts, the new religion welcomes them, but people from the old religion try to stop them. If they can't, they'll try to kill them. This happened to me," says Bharti who was shot in the chest and leg. After independence in 1947, the Indian government introduced positive discrimination in favour of low caste groups, but not everyone enjoys the same benefits. It’s a highly complex benefit structure with certain jobs, education opportunities and political representation reserved for different social and religious groups. The Reservation Act covers a wide range of eventualities, but for Dalits the disadvantages of conversion may arguably outweigh the advantages, especially when it comes to jobs. "The protection includes Sikhs and Jains, and Buddhists, but it doesn't include Christians and Muslims, so what happens is that they get excluded from those - the quotas for SCs [Scheduled Castes]," says Meenakshi Ganguly, South Asia director for Human Rights Watch. Kanojia, for instance, has not been able to get a government job. "If you don't have a lower caste certificate you won't get a reserved job. I don't have the lower caste certificate. My parents were illiterate and had little understanding of things... I can't get a job anywhere," says Kanojia. Set primarily in Mumbai and in the Madhya Pradesh countryside, this film provides an insight into conversion to other religions - the social reformer and principal architect of the Indian constitution, BR Ambedkar, was born a Dalit and converted to Buddhism and many followed in his footsteps - and the processes for finalising conversions. We hear the personal stories of different Dalit Muslims and the campaign of one man, descended from Muslim converts, to end garbage picking and discrimination against Dalits in Madhya Pradesh. This is part of a broader struggle where castes, clans and religions determine the course of millions of lives. More from Al Jazeera World on: YouTube - http://aje.io/ajw_yt Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/AlJazeeraWorld Twitter - https://twitter.com/AlJazeera_World Visit our website - http://www.aljazeera.com/aljazeeraworld Subscribe to our channel - http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe
Просмотров: 375809 Al Jazeera English
http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/katyimoore
 
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Hello, In April 2015 I will be running the Virgin Money London Marathon to support the inspiring and brave work of Womankind Worldwide. Womankind Worldwide partners with women's rights organisations in Africa, Asia and Latin America to challenge discrimination against women. Their work reaches the most marginalised women and girls and empowers them to have the confidence to claim their rights and improve their lives. Womankind Worldwide uses their resources, expertise and network of connections to increase the profiles of their partner organisations and attract support from sponsors and decision-makers. Womankind Worldwide are at the forefront of providing a better world for women and I couldn't be more proud to be running for them in April. My target is to raise £2500. Any money you are able to contribute will make a difference to the lives of women around the world and will keep me going through the 26.2 miles. This will be invaluable to me during the rough moments, there's going to be a few! http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/katyimoore Thank you for visiting, and hopefully donating. Lots of love, Katy XXX http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/KatyIMoore www.womankind.org.uk Music "First Fires" Bonobo ft. Grey Reverend - Maya Jane Coles Remix
Просмотров: 275 Katy Moore
#Outsourced
 
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NEHAWU STATEMENT ON OUTSOURCING AT UCT The University of Cape Town has a history of creative struggle against oppression, discrimination and disadvantage. Some UCT staff and students at this institution have been in the vanguard of South Africa’s historic change, playing a distinctive role in inter alia helping to build an equitable and dynamic nation. Those UCT staff and student’s key concerns with access, equity and quality in higher education arise from extensive practical engagement in helping the historically marginalised participate fully in the life of the nation. But today workers at the University of Cape Town are still experiencing all forms of discrimination and inequalities. Black workers and mainly women are still marginalised, continue to earn apartheid and poverty wages and are placed in employment positions with no real benefits. The University of Cape Town is responsible, through outsourcing, for bringing private companies into this public sector institution. These private sector companies are making profit out of public sector funding and the exploited labour of workers. Privatisation, from public – private partnership to outsourcing, contracting out services, commercialization etc, costs workers more and delivers less. When privatizing or contracting out services to private companies for profit, the workers and the poor lose. Privatisation puts money into business profits and cheats workers out of decent and quality jobs and wages within the University. Privatisation cheats the University Community out of services they need and deserve. We end up funding profits, not services!!!!!! Profiteering leads to reduced access, service cuts, inequality, poverty wages and bad working conditions for workers. The vast majority of cafeteria, bookshop, maintenance workers, cleaners, catering, security workers and landscapers are employed by contractors instead of the University. These contracted service workers – not counted on the University’s official employment rolls and rarely mentioned in the public discourse – constitute the University’s invisible workforce. These workers take home poverty wages at the end of each month; These workers don’t enjoy proper benefits such as medical aid; These workers or the dependants don’t enjoy proper study benefits; These workers are unilaterally transferred from contract to contract; These workers are summarily dismissed for minor transgressions; These workers face discrimination each and every day; These workers gets oppressed and exploited each and every day; The University of Cape Town is renowned for innovation and forward thinking but when it comes to fair labour practices, the conduct of private companies and workers’ rights in private companies, the University is very much in the Stone Age. The state of play at the University now since 1994 is that the rich are getting richer and the working poor are being exploited with contracts that aren’t worth the paper they’re written on. Yet, consistent with its past history the University can help fight inequality and foster inclusive growth by paying contracted workers better wages and improved benefits. Based on the above we as workers decided to embark on a consistent campaign against outsourcing and we demand of UCT Council: Review the Out-Sourcing as a model for service delivery in the University; Re-Employment: Directly re-employ all workers in outsourced services within the University; The full implementation of the recommendations off the UCT Council appointed outsourcing review committee. A Basic Minimum Wage of R10 000. Introduce a minimum basic wage of R10, 000 plus R10, 000 annual bonuses as a step towards a living wage for workers in private companies. This must be a pre-condition for any private company seeking business at the University; Wage Gap: Narrow the wage gap between the highest and lowest wage earner to 1 – 25 for both public and private workers at UCT. In 2014, the highest wage earner, the UCT Vice-Chancellor, enjoyed a salary of over 2.8Million per annum. Decent benefits and facilities for workers in private companies at the University; • Job Security. In the interim, keep and protect the workers who are here and no unilateral transfer from contract to contract; End A special thank you to the workers who shared their stories with us. Your words are much appreciated. #EndOutsourcing #DecoloniseLabour #October6
Просмотров: 10233 Rhodes Must Fall
'If you don't have land you are nothing'
 
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A film about marginalised women's access to land in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This film was made by women in Mumosho district, eastern DRC as part of a project funded by DFID. The participatory video project in Mumosho was designed and led by Millie Harvey.
Просмотров: 1143 womenforwomenuk
Congo pygmies fight for their rights
 
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Pigmies in the Democratic Republic of Congo have been demanding protection against discrimination. They accuse some communities of marginalisation. Susan Mwongeli reports
Просмотров: 859 CGTN Africa
Women's Subordination
 
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Просмотров: 226 Ina Dodoveci
No person should be discriminated against: Mbete
 
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ANC Chairperson Baleka Mbete has told Stellenbosch Univesity students that no person should be marginalised for their language, culture and race. She was addressing students during the 60th anniversary of the Freedom Charter. For more News visit: http://www.sabc.co.za/news Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SABCNewsOnline?lang=en Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SABCNewsOnline
Просмотров: 228 SABC Digital News
Parity - Gender Ranking Index App | NewsWatch Review
 
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Parity was created by The Meera Kaul Foundation, a non-profit that works worldwide with companies and individuals to end economic marginalization of women. With Parity, women can see how companies fare in the gender bias category before deciding to work with them. The app allows women to share data about gender bias incidents, enhance parity in work place policies and reduce incidents of sexual harassment. The initiative is a tool to increase the participation of women in the workforce and provide companies data on how women who work for them are feeling. They can also see how companies have responded to gender bias incidents once reported. Now, the app won’t publish data about a company if it’s only from one person. They want the data to be fair to both the individual AND the company so that the gender bias rank makes sense. The overall goal is for women to feel good about the environment they’re working in and be a participant in creating a safer and more productive workplace. Parity is free and compatible with iOS and Android devices. To learn more, head to http://www.parityapp.com/ today. Subscribe to NewsWatch: http://www.youtube.com/user/tvconsumerwatch?sub_confirmation=1
Просмотров: 1925 NewsWatchTV
DA2015 Deirdre Schlehofer
 
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Human Rights and Global Health for Deaf Women This paper reviews the health literature on Deaf women from developing and developed countries, asserting that these women’s experiences are different and under-studied. Minority communities with a special focus on women from developing and developed countries have been extensively studied, although research with Deaf communities, especially women, is scarce. Health problems linked to serious consequences are often a result of societal factors such as poverty and discrimination. Web of Science, Psych Abstracts, and PubMed were searched for articles on Deaf women across the world. Example key words used were: deaf, women, health and inequality. Although the phrase ‘women with disabilities,’ does not fit the socially constructed meaning of Deaf communities that historically revolve around sign language as a linguistic right, this phrase was used to ensure a more comprehensive review. As well, the information is evidence-based and augmented by case studies, where appropriate. In the review, key themes emerged such as perceived stigma, marginalization and victimization by sexual assault. Moreover, Deaf women from developed and developing countries share similarities in the experience of intimate partner violence regardless of legal rights and access to health care. Notwithstanding its major World Federation of the Deaf (WFD) project Deaf people and human rights (2009), few findings have been identified in terms of sign language and gender. Due to limited data on Deaf communities worldwide concerns about reliability are compounded by complexities across languages, infrastructure, societal barriers, and issues with research design. For example, the WFD Health Resources Initiative Survey (2011) was an important global survey focusing on Deaf people for the first time. Today Deaf women across the world are gaining awareness of human rights through various avenues. Nevertheless, they continue to encounter limitations such as a lack of access to health services. More research is needed focusing on Deaf women across cultures and continents (e.g., cultural practices and globalization). It is important to acknowledge that these women’s stories should be given voice in justice and health arenas, leading to their empowerment and positive action. Human rights are women’s rights and women’s rights are human rights. http://deafacademics2015.com
Просмотров: 382 Deaf Academics 2015
Prof. K. Marulasiddappa - LITERARY REPRESENTATIONS AND EXPERIENCES OF DISCRIMINATION
 
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Prof. K. Marulasiddappa, Writer and Theatre Exponent, Bengaluru SESSION-II LITERARY REPRESENTATIONS AND EXPERIENCES OF DISCRIMINATION - REFLECTIONS ON AFRO-AMERICAN & DALIT TEXTS Dalits and African-Americans in 21st Century: Learning from Cross-Cultural Experiences Organized by Centre for Study of Social Exclusion and Inclusive Policies (CSSEIP) & Dr. Ambedkar Studies Centre National Law School of India University (NLSIU), Bengaluru Sponsored by Indian Council For Social Science Research (ICSSR), New Delhi This seminar is proposed to bring scholars from USA and India to discuss and share their expertise and learning focused on understanding caste and race from critical perspective. The purpose of the conference is therefore to engage in cross-cultural discussions about the similarities and differences between the African-Americans in USA and the Dalits in India with regard to their experiences of exclusion and discrimination, marginalization and exploitation and threat to their life itself, and that it would provide the participants of both USA and India with invaluable insights in understanding such realities that the two countries are faced with today.
FORSAKEN NORTH  tales of Revisiting historical trauma  On Assignement  a project prepared by kenyan
 
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Surveying a history of marginalisation and distance from government support, Yussuf A Korow, Kenya freelance journalist explores the legal and administrative impediments to have plagued the development of the region of Northern Kenya. Citing a litany of human rights abuses and the discrimination faced by inhabitants of the region, An insightful glimpse in to the deplorable state of affairs in the forsaken north. The harrowing tell of stories in NE Kenya, Despite the many achievements of the past 52 years, Kenyans and especially the residents of the north eastern counties of Garissa, Wajir and Mandera view this current threat to nationhood as the most serious yet they have faced since independence.We explore The inside narrative.
Просмотров: 699 KOROW ON Assignment
Mexican-American Woman Breaks Down Sharing Experience With Discrimination
 
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Episode 001: "The Carla’s And The Sandy’s" featuring Lupe Montes Hirt (ñ).mx Born in the US and raised in a traditional Mexican household speaking Spanish, Guadalupe didn’t speak English until kindergarten and was considered a foreigner. To this day, she finds nothing more fulfilling than helping translate for people because she hated it when she was that person that people didn’t understand. being eñye | Screening OR Speaking Request Application: https://bit.ly/2EnnW8z What's an ñ? First-generation American Latinos with at least one parent from a Spanish-speaking country. LEARN MORE: http://projectenye.com/ **SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS** Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/projectenye/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/projectenye LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/denisesolercox/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/projectenye/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.ph/projectenye/ Jump on the waiting list to see being eñye here: https://bit.ly/2z9dd4w Join our growing FREE FB community: https://www.enyecommunity.com See our award-winning film "being eñye" now: https://bit.ly/2MChUdm
Просмотров: 2716 Project Eñye
Islamic Awakening - Exploring the concept of social resistance in Islam (P.1)
 
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In recent years, we have seen how protests and increased political participation have collectively shaped events in the Middle East, in predominantly Muslim countries. Massive peaceful street protests, in part mobilized through a series of globally-networked social media platforms, confirmed increased civic and political participation among a new generation of Muslim women and men in the Middle East. Young Muslims in Western Europe find themselves experiencing economic marginalization, cultural exclusion and political dislocation, which have led to frustration and violence. At the same time, young Muslims in the West often find themselves experiencing discrimination. As a result many have emerged in positive social engagement and alliances to challenge Islamophobia, cultural exclusion and marginalization. In this edition of Islamic Awakening, we ask: How has Islam influenced nonviolent movements in recent times? Live @ http://www.presstv.ir/live.html Twitter @ http://twitter.com/PressTV LiveLeak @ http://www.liveleak.com/c/PressTV Facebook @ http://www.facebook.com/PRESSTV Google+ @ http://plus.google.com/+VideosPTV Instagram @ http://instagram.com/presstvchannel
Просмотров: 252 PressTV
Feature on the plight of the Christian community in Baghdad
 
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1. Wide of the city of Kirkuk 2. Street scene in Kirkuk 3. Kirkuk castle 4. Exterior of Saint Mary's Catholic Church 5. Sign reading "Saint Mary's Catholic Church" 6. Dome of the church 7. Various of Mass 8. Woman praying 9. Priest giving communion 10. Statue of Virgin Mary 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Luwis Zarco, Catholic Archbishop of Kirkuk: "This is not the culture of Iraqis or the nature of Iraqis. We have lived during centuries together in a respectful attitude and friendship." 12. Mid of church exterior 13. SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Father Siliwa Aziz Rasam, Caretaker of Saint Mary's Church: "Regrettably, we have noticed that so many family left the country because of the security situation. It is too difficult now to live in this country which is in fact the land of civilisations and welfare." 14. People leaving church after mass 15. SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) Azeria Ashona, teacher: "As a result of hard circumstances and dangerous security situation, we cannot perform Mass, wedding parties or other occasions." 16. Street pan to exterior of church STORYLINE: The Iraqi Christian community, about 3 percent of the country's 26 (m) million people, has little political or military clout to defend itself, and some Islamic insurgents call Christians "crusaders" whose real loyalty lies with US troops. Many churches are now nearly empty, with many of their faithful either gone or too scared to attend. Only two dozen took communion in St. Mary's Church in the northern city of Kirkuk on Sunday. As many as 50 percent of Iraq's Christians may already have left the country, according to a report issued on Wednesday by the US Commission on International Religious Freedom, a federal monitoring and advisory group in Washington DC. The report says that these groups face widespread violence from Sunni insurgents and foreign jihadis, and that they also suffer pervasive discrimination and marginalisation at the hands of the national government, regional governments, and para-state militias. Islamic extremists have also targeted liquor stores, hair salons and other Christian-owned businesses, saying they violate Islam, the report said. "This is not the culture of Iraqis or the nature of Iraqis. We have lived during centuries together in a respectful attitude and friendship," said Luwis Zarco, the Archbishop of Kirkuk. In much of the Middle East, Christians are a largely tolerated minority that has achieved a measure of business and professional success, but they are sometimes viewed with suspicion by their Muslim neighbours. "Regrettably, we have noticed that so many family left the country because of the security situation. It is too difficult now to live in this country which is in fact the land of civilisations and welfare," Father Siliwa Aziz Rasam, the caretaker of Saint Mary's Church. Meanwhile, Azeria Ashona, a Christian teacher said Christians are no longer able to perform their occasions properly because of the security situation. ''As a result of hard circumstances and dangerous security situation, we cannot perform Mass, wedding parties or other occasions.'' In Saddam-era Iraq, the country's 800,000 Christians - many of them Chaldean-Assyrians and Armenians, with small numbers of Roman Catholics - were generally left alone. Many, such as Saddam Hussein's foreign minister and Deputy Prime Minister Tariq Aziz, reached the highest levels of power. But after US forces toppled Saddam, insurgents launched a coordinated bombing campaign in the summer of 2004 against Baghdad churches, sending some Christians fleeing in fear. A second wave of anti-Christian attacks hit last September after Pope Benedict XVI made comments perceived to be anti-Islam. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d112a6af954f8904cf00ff8468c17fb2 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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Gender Equality in Education
 
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Education systems have made major strides to close gender gaps in student performance but girls and boys remain deeply divided in career choices, which are being made much earlier than commonly thought, according to a new OECD report. For more info please visit: http://www.oecd.org/pisa/keyfindings/pisa-2012-results-gender.htm
Просмотров: 43361 OECD
My Experience Traveling As a Black Man (Moor) In Guatemala
 
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Inspirit Nutrition back again for another installment. Give Yourself Permission To Live Your Dream Facebook: www.facebook.com/Inspirit.Nutrition For Private Nutrition Consultations: Email inspirit.nutrition@gmail.com
Просмотров: 6641 Mark Jones II
Public Companies for Corporate Good
 
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January 19; Godda, Jharkhand On September 7th of last year, residents of Lohandia village in Jharkhand sat on a strike near the familiar mining site of Eastern Coalfields Limited. The vibrations emanating from the blasts for coal extraction has cracked the walls of villagers’ houses. “A child was injured by the debris that fell from the ceiling,” a resident told Community Correspondent Mary Nisha Hansda, whose relatives are effected by the same. After two days of strike and an unsuccessful negotiation, the contractors filed a case against the protestors — for not showing up to work. The blasting range only goes higher with time at coalmines — extraction becomes difficult as we try to go deeper, having swept the surface. If it continues unchecked, the whole village will soon be reduced to puddles of cement and bricks. At a time when the government should be reducing the blasting range with alacrity, considering they are people’s representatives, the response was chilling. As the protesters — women and children included — waited for a solution to emerge; police, middlemen and contractors sat down to talk. The aggrieved party was not even part of the discussion. Soon, the Police Sub-Inspector came to forcefully disband the protesters. “They beat us up, and fired their guns at us,” Kiran Devi recalled later. “We are no terrorists and they had weapons. We had nothing in our hands.” Eastern Coalfields Limited (ECL) is a subsidiary of Coal India Limited — a state owned private enterprise. ECL was formed in 1975, when the private coalmines were nationalised by then Prime Minister, Indira Gandhi to revamp poor working conditions of labour. It is ironical that the people of Lohandia were failed by the very public company that was formed to make things better for them. It is instructive, however, to see how far away public enterprises have come from the core value on which they were conceived — public service. The interests of the residents are not even considered anymore in India’s unquenchable thirst for natural resources. Environmental consequences will surely follow soon, but the repercussions of corporate greed will be immediate. 250 families of Lohandia village will not have a roof on their heads. Incidents like this barely get covered in conversations about how mining will bring economic benefit to the country; protests on the ground get projected as nuisances rather than genuine concerns. What is the point of journalistic institutions if people’s voices get blocked out of their air-conditioned offices? Community Correspondent Nisha, on the other hand, lives with these people and is trying to bring their voices out. The marginalised people who are discriminated against find their platform through her videos. “I made this video because I am one of them,” CC Nisha said later. The CC is still trying to change the status quo that has existed far too long — fighting for the rights of her community, alone. So far, this has resulted in empty howlers of promises, but when she succeeds, we will update you. Meanwhile, you can call the District Collector of Godda district at +91-9431134597 and ask that mining range be reduced to a point where the locals can feel safe in their own house.
Просмотров: 242 VideoVolunteers
Untouchables
 
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In India, discrimination again Dalits or Untouchables is illegal, widespread and shameful. Now video volunteers are documenting the daily bouts of humiliation they encounter in a campaign to finally "end this age old oppression." Producers Andrew Tkach and Scott Bronstein document untouchability with Christiane Amanpour in this 60 Minutes report.
Просмотров: 15370 messymomentmedia
BANGLADESH: WOMEN ARE ENCOURAGED TO VOTE
 
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English/Nat Voters in Bangladesh go to the polls Wednesday, hoping to end a political standoff that has paralysed their government and threatened their nation's young democracy. But not every Bangladeshi will cast a ballot - there is one section of society still under- represented in the polls. In some remote villages, women won't be voting - either because the men will not allow them or simply because they don't realise they can. This is the village of Mahamaya in Bangladesh, about 200 kilometres from the capital Dhaka. Women haven't voted here for more than 25 years. It was only in 1991 that about 4- thousand women were registered as voters for the first time. For decades, they had been refused the right to cast their ballot by the men of the village who believed it was shameful. This feeling is still echoed by the elders of the more remote villages. SOUNDBITE: "From the very beginning of our society women are restricted not to vote. For 25 years they have not voted and that is right." SUPER CAPTION: Village elder There are a variety of reasons why women didn't vote - including the fact that most women simply didn't realise they could. SOUNDBITE: "We never voted. Because nobody told us we have this right. Our husbands didn't take us, they never told us that voting is something we should do. No one ever told us we can vote." SUPER CAPTION: Female villager But not all reasons were that straightforward. One religious leader led women to believe their villages would be plagued with insects if they did cast their ballot. He said it was wrong for women to vote. But both the government and non government agencies are trying to change this belief. They set up a campaign in 1994 to convince women that they do have a right to vote. After various initiatives and visits form local authorities, 86 per cent of the women are now registered. But the authorities still keep up methods of encouraging the women to vote. This is a meeting aimed at motivating women voters. Bicycle rallies are another way Bangladeshi authorities are trying to reach the women. Hamida Hossain - a Bangladeshi human rights activist - believes it's very important that women have the right to vote. SOUNDBITE: "The citizens of Bangladesh have gained the right to vote after a very long struggle for democracy. The right for women to exercise this right to vote is also a fundamental right. But there are several places in Bangladesh especially the remote villages where conservative male leaders are trying to stop women from voting. This is a violation of their human rights." SUPER CAPTION: Hamida Hossain a Bangladeshi human rights activist In 1991, a woman became prime minister - a great boost for the right to vote campaign. And most women now say this time they will exercise their right - for many it will be for the first time. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/5c1dea176fd31bd0d4e3948cbf011b9b Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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MOTHER COURAGEOUS
 
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Each year, 40,000 women die in Uttar Pradesh alone due to pregnancy related causes. In a journey across seven districts of Uttar Pradesh, the Film explores opinions of government officials, activists, ordinary men and women to reveal social discrimination and state sponsored neglect of women's maternal health. Directed by DEBALINA MAJUMDER; Producer & Commissioning Editor - RAJIV MEHROTRA, PSBT Aarogya Film Festival - Youth & Health, Pune Debalina is an independent filmmaker. Her short film, Joy Run, was selected in the Talent Campus of the Berlin Film Festival 2005 and included in the FIFA World Cup 2006 compilation. In 2006, she directed Broken Land, produced by Channel 4, UK. Kee Katha Tahar Shathe [Sh... sh... s(h)e] about male homosexual sex workers in Kolkata was her first documentary. Debalina is interested in the politics of marginalisation, oppression and environmental issues. Rajiv Mehrotra, is an independent filmmaker and Managing Trustee of PSBT. His work has won more than two hundred awards and has had more than fourteen hundred film festival screenings. He is Trustee and Secretary of The Foundation for Universal Responsibility of HH the Dalai Lama established with the Nobel Peace Prize. Rajiv's nine books have been published in 50 editions/languages. PSBT (The Public Service Broadcasting Trust) The Public Service Broadcasting Trust, India, commissions, produces and mentors 50+ independent documentary films a year. Our work wins international critical claim. Thus far, on an average, for every film we support, there are two film festival selections by professional juries around the world and we win an award for every two to three of them. We are a not-for-profit based in New Delhi that works to create and sustain a credible independent niche space for public service broadcasting in India. We work with extremely modest budgets and technologies, about two thirds of our filmmakers are starting out talents from across the country, fifty per cent are women. We have been/ are primarily funded by Prasar Bharati, India’s national public broadcaster via its television wing Doordarshan (DD) and before this, the External Publicity and Public Diplomacy Division of the Ministry of External Affairs, the Films Division and private Foundations. PSBT is managed by a core Programme Team that includes Executive Producers Tulika Srivastava and Ridhima Mehra with Sandeep Bhatt and others . It is overseen by a distinguished Board of Trustees who include Adoor Gopalakrishnan, Fali Nariman, Kiran Karnik, Mrinal Sen, Shyam Benegal, Sharmila Tagore, Sunita Narain, and CEO, Prasar Bharati. CREDITS CAMERA & SOUND: Debalina EDITING: Sankha Produced by PSBT in partnership with Doordarshan http://www.psbt.org/; http://www.ddindia.gov.in/ Festival, screening and purchase queries: distribution@psbt.org
Просмотров: 152 PSBT India
Discrimination among school children in Dochanch, Jharkhand - Video Volunteer Dimpi reports
 
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This video was made by a Video Volunteers Community Correspondent. Community Correspondents come from marginalised communities in India and produce videos on unreported stories. These stories are ’news by those who live it.’ They give the hyperlocal context to global human rights and development challenges. See more such videos at www.videovolunteers.org. Take action for a more just global media by sharing their videos and joining in their call for change.
Просмотров: 99 VideoVolunteers
Red Cross begins Roma census; presser
 
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SHOTLIST 17 July 2008 1. Wide of square with Red Cross vans 2. Wide of Roma people 3. Various of Roma woman showing her documents 4. Red Cross worker showing health card 5. Roma couple waiting to be registered 6. Red Cross staff with Roma people 7. SOUNDBITE (Italian) Osmanovic Majk, Roma born in Italy, Vox Pop: "This parliament now, together with the League (Northern League party), doesn't think twice (about implementing anti-Roma measures). Before, there was the Bossi-Fini law (strict rules against illegal immigration), then they had removed it, and eventually they took it out again and reinforced it with this so called "security measures package", but they did a good thing. I am a foreigner and I am afraid to walk (freely) around because of the others (illegal immigrants who commit crimes), and I can understand if an Italian in his own house is even more afraid than me." 8. Various of Red Cross employees with Roma children 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Massimo Barra, President of Italian Red Cross: "This is not a fingerprint procedure, this is the paranoiac interpretation of media. Italian Red Cross has nothing to do with fingerprints, nothing to do (with it). We are here only for humanitarian purposes, to get in touch with these people that have been always marginalised, stigmatised, and discriminated. We want to know each (one) of them to help each (one) of them." 10. Roma mother with child 18 July 2008 11. Wide of joint presser of Italian Red Cross with Rome Prefecture: 12. SOUNDBITE (Italian) Fernando Capuano, local Italian Red Cross President: (Talking about yesterday's census at Rome-Corviale camp) "You know, children were in the majority. There are 32 people, 19 adults and 13 children. The most alarming fact we can report is that only 3 out of 13 children had received mandatory vaccination." 13. Red Cross workers 14. SOUNDBITE (Italian) Carlo Mosca, Rome Prefect: "In situations requiring it, and where the magistrate agrees, they (fingerprints) will be taken just as they would be carried out on any Italian or foreigner who is present on our territory." 15. Wide of presser STORYLINE The first official attempt to collect data from Roma people living in ramshackle camps on the outskirts of many Italian cities and towns was under way in Rome on Thursday. The census began officially in the late afternoon, when several Italian Red Cross teams reached Corviale, a poor area in the south-west outskirts of Rome. Some fifty Roma people live in this area with their families in makeshift shelters and unhealthy conditions. Name, surname, photos and health conditions were requested. No fingerprints were taken from any of the people registered by the Red Cross. The census launched by the Italian Red Cross aims at identifying all the Roma people who do not exist in the Italian medical and civil system, but many Roma people are still afraid of providing their own information fearing this could lead to their expulsion from a country where many of them and their children were born. Only few Roma people presented themselves spontaneously to the Red Cross workers in Rome on Thursday, and most of those who arrived had some form of documentation which made them feel safe enough. "I am a foreigner and I am afraid to walk (freely) around because of the others (illegal immigrants who commit crimes), and I can understand if an Italian in his own house is even more afraid than me," said Osmanovic Majk, an Italian-born Roma. The national president of the Italian Red Cross Massimo Barra stressed the humanitarian purpose of this measure. Local authorities in Rome are largely staying away from the controversial move to fingerprint adults and children living in makeshift nomad camps. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/608137107a76fd630b4c64a49ba8ff92 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Просмотров: 54 AP Archive
[Full Insert] DTV - 16 Days of Activism
 
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16 Days of Activism began as a global campaign against gender violence in 1991, and in many nations, including South Africa, the campaign has been adapted to cover violence against women and children. The campaign runs every year from 25 November through to 10 December, encompassing both the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, and International Human Rights Day. This year, DTV visited a local school to allow children to share their thoughts on violence against women and children
Просмотров: 224 DTV | DeafTV SA
Bomb explosion at Iraq mosque kills seven people
 
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1. Exterior of mosque targeted by bomb 2. Close of mosque 3. Coffin on ground inside mosque with mourners and father of the dead man crying 4. Father of the dead crying and praying 5. Various of funeral 6. SOUNDBITE: (Arabic) No Name Given, Cousin of the dead man: "What did we do to be killed and attacked? Have we threatened anyone committed a crime? People were praying at the mosque and when they left and a bomb went off next to them. Can any official tell us why this happened? Let officials find a solution for us. Do we have to live this way?" 7. Various of coffin being taken away for burial STORYLINE: The funeral was held for one of the victims of a bomb attack outside a Sunni mosque in Baghdad on Friday that killed seven people and wounded at least 30 others. The father of the unnamed victim mourned his loss with others amid calls for tighter security. "What did we do to be killed and attacked? Have we threatened anyone committed a crime?" asked a cousin of the dead man. "Let officials find a solution for us. Do we have to live this way?" Police officials said the attack on the Sunni mosque occurred as worshippers were leaving mid-day prayers at al-Ghofran mosque in the primarily Sunni area of Rashidiya. There was no immediate claim of responsibility. Sunni mosques have been targeted in several recent attacks amid rising sectarian tension in Iraq following a deadly crackdown by security forces on a Sunni protest site in Hawija town last month. Since then, violence has been on the upswing, raising concerns that the nation is on a return to bloody fighting in the past decade that approached a state of civil war. Many from Iraq's Sunni minority say they are marginalised and discriminated against by the Shiite-led government. They say they face discrimination, particularly in the application of a tough anti-terrorism law that they believe unfairly targets their sect. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ee2b475a9b8922fbd063804fe53afed3 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Просмотров: 487 AP Archive
Abducted Israeli and Norwegian are set free in Egypt
 
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SHOTLIST ++QUALITY AS INCOMING++ ++NIGHT SHOTS++ 1. Released Norwegian tourist (woman with green scarf) and Israeli tourist (brown body warmer and headscarf) entering police headquarters with officials 2. Released tourists greeting officials 3. Mid of Israeli tourist seated 4. Mid of Norwegian tourist talking on phone 5. Mid of Israeli tourist seated STORYLINE: Two tourists abducted by Bedouin gunmen last week in the Sinai Peninsula were released early on Tuesday, according to Egyptian security officials. The officials say the two - an Israeli man and a Norwegian woman - were set free and were taken to police headquarters in the city of el-Arish near Egypt's border with Israel and Gaza. The tourists were seized last Friday along a main road in Sinai and were held in a desolate mountainous area. Authorities had negotiated with the kidnappers who demanded the release of a cousin suspected of involvement in the killing of policemen. The officials say authorities gave assurances to the kidnappers they would look into their demand. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the subject. Tourists have been targeted in the past by Bedouin in Sinai wanting to pressure police to free detained relatives. Abductees are typically not held long and released unharmed. The kidnapping of the two tourists is the second such incident in one month. The first were a British couple who were held briefly on March 7 by Bedouins who demanded release of their detained relative arrested and accused of smuggling weapons from Libya to Egypt. The local Bedouin population is largely resentful of the central government over years of discrimination, marginalisation and heavy-handed security sweeps under former autocratic ruler Hosni Mubarak who was ousted in 2011 popular uprising. Many live on smuggling of weapons and drugs and human trafficking. The northern region of Egypt and border areas with Israel and Gaza have plunged into lawlessness and are believed to be strongholds of Islamic extremists. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/56e8a82e4aa3eb58944a97247d827348 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Просмотров: 21 AP Archive
Maximizing Health Care for Underserved and Marginalized Youth
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Dr. Marissa Raymond-Flesch, UCSF Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, focuses her research on access to care for adolescents and young adults with a particular interest in in improving reproductive health access for minority and border communities. She is especially interested in using community-based participatory research to bring health care and health education into these underserved communities. Recorded on 10/29/2014. Series: "UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine presents Mini Medical School for the Public" [1/2015] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 28888]
Просмотров: 600 University of California Television (UCTV)
Children of those held at WW2 camp for Roma plan a memorial at the site
 
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(14 Sep 2010) SHOTLIST Montreuil-Bellay, 9 September 2010 1. Wide of field where French Gypsy internment camp was, memorial plaque in foreground 2. Wide of cows grazing, remains of camp in foreground 3. Close-up on plaque reading (French) "In this place was the internment camp of Montreuil-Bellay from November 1941 until January 1945. Thousands of gypsy men, women and children suffered here from arbitrary detention." 4. Amateur historian Jacques Sigot pointing to a old photo of the camp inside of a book; then walks to area 5. Close-up of book showing still photo (photo part of Jacques Sigot's archives) of the camp in the 1940's during World War II 6. SOUNDBITE (French) Jacques Sigot, Amateur Historian of French Gypsies: "Those who are sedentary don't like the nomads, they're scared of them, and they used the war as an excuse to keep them somewhere, to easily settle them down in a place behind barbed wire." 7. Sigot holding photographs of French gypsies behind barbed wire 8. SOUNDBITE (French) Jacques Sigot, Amateur Historian of French Gypsies: "People were happy that these nomads (they were called nomads at that time) were locked up." 9. Wide of window to underground prison inside the camp 10. Sigot entering old prison 11. Tracking shot of staircase up Poitiers, 13 September 2010 12. Wide of French Gypsy camp 13. Various of French gypsy Milo Delage and his brother and friends walking 14. Various of Delage showing a photo from his own archives of his aunt photographed as a young girl interned inside the camp in Montreuil-Bellay 15. SOUNDBITE (French) Milo Delage, French Gypsy: "It was an internment camp, it was a concentration camp. They were surrounded by barbed wire. They were in barracks living one on top of the other." 16. Family cooking outside 17. Close-up of young girl holding doll 18. Delage seated with personal archive 19. Delage flipping through his "carnet de circulation" - papers identifying him as a travelling person or "gens du voyage" which he needs to renew every three months 20. SOUNDBITE (French) Milo Delage, French Gypsy: "There are all of the ingredients of what happened before the war for the gypsies at the moment, all of the ingredients - the racism, the discrimination, the identity papers (for travelling) that continue, that they haven't stopped using." 21. Delage speaking to child STORYLINE In the French village of Montreuil-Bellay, three surreal staircases rise out of the parched grass and lead to nowhere, in the middle of a thistle-tangled field behind a hedge of blackberries. That is all that is left of the camp where thousands of French Gypsies were interned in this village in the Saumur wine region during World War II. Here, hungry children once crowded behind barbed wire, hoping Sunday strollers might toss them leftover food. Anyone caught trying to escape was locked in a filthy hole underground, a prison within a prison. As today's France expels a wave of Romanian Gypsies seeking an escape from hardship back home, children of the camp's survivors have been drawing up plans for a memorial to the site's chilling past. They have also been caught up in their own battle against what they say is state-sponsored discrimination against one of Europe's most marginalised, misunderstood minorities. This shameful episode of French history is little known and isn't in the school textbooks: Under the German Occupation, thousands of Gypsies, mostly citizens of France, were rounded up and put in 31 internment camps administered and guarded by their fellow Frenchmen. Perhaps most shocking in this country that considers itself the cradle of human rights is that France kept some Gypsies locked up until 1946, after the end of the Nazi occupation. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d25b6fa46bfe8aaee07bee54c975c927 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Просмотров: 225 AP Archive
Suicide Among Gay and Bisexual Men: A Syndemic Theory Approach
 
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Dulai, Joshun. (2014, October). Suicide Among Gay and Bisexual Men: A Syndemic Theory Approach. Presented at the Gay Men's Health Summit, Vancouver, Canada. Several studies have demonstrated that gay and bisexual men are at increased risk of suicidal behaviours but less attention has been given to the processes that contribute to this inequity. One theory that may be able to explain this phenomenon is syndemics, which posits that health problems tend to co-occur, overlap and fuel each other and create a mutually reinforcing cluster of epidemics. Most research on syndemic theory and gay and bisexual men have focused on HIV as an outcome variable, but our study is only one of a few that focuses on suicide as a product of syndemics. Looking at participants from the 2011 Sex Now Survey we found that suicidality (suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts) was positively associated with individual marginalization indicators (verbal violence, physical violence, sexual violence, bullying, and work-place discrimination) and psychosocial issues (substance use, depression, anxiety, diagnosis of an STI or with HIV, and condomless sex) in Canadian gay and bisexual men. Furthermore the prevalence of suicidality cumulatively increased with each additional form of marginalization or psychosocial issue experienced by individuals. Our investigation suggests that syndemic is a useful framework for studying suicide in gay and bisexual men and should inform suicide prevention services in the country.
Просмотров: 504 Community-Based Research Centre
2015-03 Women Rising in Bangladesh - Part 2 - Erica
 
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This video is about 2015-03 Women Rising in Bangladesh - Part 2 - Erica
Просмотров: 115 John Coonrod
Prof. Sudhir Krishnaswamy - DIVERSITY AND AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
 
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Prof. Sudhir Krishnaswamy, Azim Premji University, Bengaluru DIVERSITY AND AFFIRMATIVE ACTION IN THE ERA OF PRIVATIZATION: AMERICAN AND INDIAN EXPERIENCES Dalits and African-Americans in 21st Century: Learning from Cross-Cultural Experiences Organized by Centre for Study of Social Exclusion and Inclusive Policies (CSSEIP) & Dr. Ambedkar Studies Centre National Law School of India University (NLSIU), Bengaluru Sponsored by Indian Council For Social Science Research (ICSSR), New Delhi This seminar is proposed to bring scholars from USA and India to discuss and share their expertise and learning focused on understanding caste and race from critical perspective. The purpose of the conference is therefore to engage in cross-cultural discussions about the similarities and differences between the African-Americans in USA and the Dalits in India with regard to their experiences of exclusion and discrimination, marginalization and exploitation and threat to their life itself, and that it would provide the participants of both USA and India with invaluable insights in understanding such realities that the two countries are faced with today.
ZabulBeheading: Rep. of Hazara Protesters speaking to Pres. Ghani at ARG - Part 2 (Nov 11, 2015 )
 
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In this video, Agaye Fiazi, representative of Grand Ayatollah Ishaq Fayaz (one of the only Hazara Ayatollahs) speaking to President Ashraf Ghani '[Your Palace guards] check my Amama (turban), my dress, my shoes [for bombs]. How many Hazara suicide bombers you know that you check my turban?' Background: On Nov 8, 2015, the intensely-persecuted Hazara community learned of the tragic news: the beheading of seven Hazara civilians abducted earlier by ISIS/Taliban in Zabul, Afghanistan. Since start of Ashraf Ghani government in Afghanistan–thanks to Hazaras staying above the ethnic fray and voting in large numbers despite him being from the community seen as persecutors of Hazaras for over a century–a spate of Hazaras abductions have started in which Hazara passengers are singled out from buses and either executed 'firing squad' style or tortured, mutilated, killed, and their bodies dumped. The ‘Zabul Beheading’ –7 Hazara civilians including 4 men, 2 women and a 9 year old girl– showed to Hazaras that Terrorists following Saudi’s Wahhabi ideology indoctrined in Saudi-financed, Pakistan-supported madrassahs will not hesitate from even torturing Hazara women and children (often a RED LINE in most conflicts) even when they are not in any sort of conflict with the followers of this vile ideology of hate. Despite Government’s best efforts– including by the 'accidental' Hazara leaders like Mohaqiq and Khalili– to quietly ‘bury’ this issue with the victims, the coffins made its way from Zabul to Ghazni (hometown of victims) and then to Kabul on Nov 10th. On Nov 11th, Kabul saw the biggest rally recorded where protesters from all caste, creed, and gender joined the massive rally carrying victims’ coffins to the Presidential Palace (ARG). This rally is now widely dubbed as ‘Inqilab-e Tabassum’ aka #SmileRevolution – dedicated to 9-year old female victim, Shukria Tabassum (literal: ThankYou Smile). Along with rally in Kabul, the country saw massive rallies condemning ISIS, Taliban, Afghan Government, as well as the so-called Hazara leaders. The rallies in Afghanistan and across the globe are predominantly by Hazara community with some notable exceptions such as the one in JalalAbad by Pashtun community. The rally is also very significant for the most-intensely persecuted Hazaras which flexed its street power and caught every corridor of power off guard. The Presidential Palace (ARG) was clearly overpowered by the hundreds of thousands of Hazara protesters. Since Hazaras are one of the most peaceful communities (across the globe), the massive rally largely remained peaceful and organized. For more information, follow: Twitter: @hazaranet | Follow hash: #ZabulBeheading Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hazara.net Web: http://tinyurl.com/qbznel8 More on Hazara Persecution & systemic discrimination: Pakistan: http://www.hazara.net/hope/ Afghanistan: http://www.hazara.net/download/ Iran: http://www.hazara.net/downloads/docs/hazaras_in_iran.pdf
Просмотров: 7970 HazaraNetVideo
Gender difference in day to day work - Mamta reports for IndiaUnheard
 
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this video was made by a Video Volunteers Community Correspondent. Community Correspondents come from marginalised communities in India and produce videos on unreported stories. These stories are ’news by those who live it.’ they give the hyperlocal context to global human rights and development challenges. See more such videos at www.videovolunteers.org. Take action for a more just global media by sharing their videos and joining in their call for change.
Просмотров: 67 VideoVolunteers
HOW TO BE PART OF THE TRANS COMMUNITY
 
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SUBSCRIBE to Kat Blaque : http://bit.ly/1D3jwSF Today's emailer wants to know how they can be part of the trans community as a trans person who isn't out yet! Get your own True Tea mug here: https://society6.com/product/true-tea_mug#27=199 Do you want my True Tea? Send me a short email or video to katstruetea@gmail.com ! ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● If you like my content and want to support me, please consider becoming a patreon patron. Your support means so much to me. My patrons are like my family and you get exclusive private vlogs about my life and more. http://www.patreon.com/katblaque I do live edit sessions and rants on my vlog channel! Please subscribe!: http://tinyurl.com/n757bs5 Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/kat.blaque.5 Twitter ► http://twitter.com/kat_blaque Tumblr ► http://katblaque.tumblr.com Art Store ► http://society6.com/kattyb Instagram ► kattyblaque.instagram.com Snapchat ► katblaque Business Inquires ► kattyblaque@gmail.com ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● Music Intro ► Rougher Than Riddim - Titus 12 "Blue - Pedro Morell Prats https://soundcloud.com/nogrief/sets/ep1
Просмотров: 13316 Kat Blaque
Prof. Anand Teltumbde - Perspectives on the Theme
 
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Prof. Anand Teltumbde, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Session 1 - Perspectives on the Theme Dalits and African-Americans in 21st Century: Learning from Cross-Cultural Experiences Organized by Centre for Study of Social Exclusion and Inclusive Policies (CSSEIP) & Dr. Ambedkar Studies Centre National Law School of India University (NLSIU), Bengaluru Sponsored by Indian Council For Social Science Research (ICSSR), New Delhi This seminar is proposed to bring scholars from USA and India to discuss and share their expertise and learning focused on understanding caste and race from critical perspective. The purpose of the conference is therefore to engage in cross-cultural discussions about the similarities and differences between the African-Americans in USA and the Dalits in India with regard to their experiences of exclusion and discrimination, marginalization and exploitation and threat to their life itself, and that it would provide the participants of both USA and India with invaluable insights in understanding such realities that the two countries are faced with today.
Untouchability In Village Council
 
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*** Nandabai Solanki is a village head of Jamod panchayat going under cast discrimination in Panchayat office. Community correspondent Vinod Wankhade reports from Maharashtra for Video Volunteers. This video was made by a Video Volunteers Community Correspondent. Community Correspondents come from marginalised communities in India and produce videos on unreported stories. These stories are ’news by those who live it.’ they give the hyperlocal context to global human rights and development challenges. See more such videos at www.videovolunteers.org. Take action for a more just global media by sharing their videos and joining in their call for change. we could hyperlink to some VV pages, like our take action page.
Просмотров: 132 VideoVolunteers
Roma community a neglected minority
 
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STORYLINE Athens - Recent File 1. Various of new motorways 2. Various Olympic village 3. Pan of Olympic sports venues 4. Close up Athens 2004 flag Aspropyrgos Industrial Zone, 25 kilometres (15.5 miles) outside Athens - August 24, 2004 5. Wide Roma settlement 6. Shack 7. People entering shack 8. Interior shack 9. Children on bench 10. Two children 11. Close up religious icons 12. Father playing with daughter 13. Wide area round settlement, pan to Roma people 14. Two men 15. Close up hands folding paper 16. SOUNDBITE (Greek) Leonidas Aristopoulos, Roma scrap metal dealer: "I'm hungry. I'm hungry. And when I'm hungry, I will steal from you because the state and the law force us to do this and become thieves. How are we going to live? We don't have any other job." 17. Leonidas Aristopoulos in foreground 18. Close up torn roof sheeting, pulling out to show shack 19. SOUNDBITE (Greek) Leonidas Aristopoulos, Roma scrap metal dealer: "I want to find some peace here and have a prefabricated home, anything, something to work with that I can put a tin roof over. That's all I want, nothing else. We're homeless." 20. Wide area round settlement 21. Children inside shack 22. SOUNDBITE (Greek) Theodoros Alexandridis, Roma Project Manager, Greek-Helsinki Monitor: "The most important problem the Roma face in Greece is actually racism in all spheres of public life, be it from going to the town hall or going to another civil agency to fill in an application or whatever. They've been treated as second class citizens." 23. Settlement 24. Close up shoes 25. Wide woman washing inside shack STORYLINE Not far from the new highways, sleek Olympic Stadium and spruced up parks and monuments of Athens lies an old problem: tens of thousands of Roma live in Greece, most of them in slums with poor sanitation, no electricity or running water. The 150-thousand Roma in Greece face scorn just as they have in the rest of Europe for ages. Most of them deal in scrap metal and sell surplus fruit and vegetables. But there are some Greeks who claim the Roma, as the gypsies prefer to call themselves, have turned to crime and do little to assimilate and raise their esteem among the mainstream population. The Greek-Helsinki monitor is a non-governmental organisation that monitors the treatment of minorities and has closely followed the treatment of the Roma in Greece. It says that the Roma have been marginalised by Greek society, with even filling out a simple municipal form becoming difficult. Some of the gypsies are Muslims with Albanian and Turkish ancestry, provoking a double dose of discrimination in Greece, a Christian Orthodox nation. But most are descendants of nomadic north Indians who made their way to Europe via the Byzantine Empire in the 11th century and have become Christian. Government officials have denied any intentional discrimination and say the country is committed to improving their lives. So far, though, pledges made in 2001 to spend 369 (M) million US dollars to help them with assimilation, education and housing have been lost in the scramble to prepare for the Olympic games. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/bd001f761ae74737ac893dcffaec05e4 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Просмотров: 1128 AP Archive
Amnesty Voices: International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women
 
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The 25th of November marked the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women. Communities across Israel are saying enough on behalf of the 1 in every 3 women worldwide who have suffered from physical or sexual violence. Amnesty International demands active involvement, coherent and comprehensive prosecution of those who use violence against women, as required by international law. Amnesty Voices is a new video platform allowing those who would otherwise be silent to speak out; giving a voice to the marginalised, while educating, impassioning, and mobilising the viewer. Filmed and Produced by: Christopher Cook and Charlie Floyd
Просмотров: 490 Amnesty International Israel