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Introduction
 
06:36
Enjoying the lectures? Come join Prof. Ayres' on Coursera! Enrolling in his course will allow you to join in discussions with fellow learners, take assessments on the material, and earn a certificate! Link - https://www.coursera.org/learn/law-student Whether you are an advanced law student looking to review the basics, or an aspiring law student looking for head start, this course will help you build the foundation you will need to succeed in law school and beyond. This course will introduce you to terminology, concepts, and tools lawyers and legal academics use to make their arguments. It will help you follow these arguments—and make arguments of your own. The course consists of a series of short lectures and assignments. A reading list complements each lesson, providing you with a roadmap to help you explore the subject matter more deeply on your own. Although the lessons may cross-reference each other, they are modular in nature: you should feel free to approach them in whatever order fits your schedule, interests, and needs.
Просмотров: 25561 YaleCourses
The Science of Well-Being - Dr. Laurie Santos' New Online Course
 
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This course is a modified version of Dr. Santos' record-breaking psychology class taught at Yale. Learn what psychological science says about living the good life and, more importantly, how to put that knowledge into practice. Enroll in the course today: https://www.coursera.org/learn/the-science-of-well-being?utm_source=YALE&utm_medium=institutions&utm_campaign=201802-YouTube-SWB
Просмотров: 68207 YaleCourses
01. Course Introduction: Rome's Greatness and First Crises
 
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The Early Middle Ages, 284--1000 (HIST 210) Professor Freedman introduces the major themes of the course: the crisis of the Roman Empire, the rise of Christianity, the threats from barbarian invasions, and the continuity of the Byzantine Empire. At the beginning of the period covered in this course, the Roman Empire was centered politically, logistically, and culturally on the Mediterranean Sea. Remarkable for its size and longevity, the Empire was further marked by its tolerance. Although it contained an eclectic mix of peoples, the Empire was unified in part by a local elite with a shared language and customs. In the third century these strengths were increasingly threatened by the Empire's sheer size, its imbalances, both East-West and urban-rural, and by an army that realizes it could make and unmake emperors. Having set the scene, Professor Freedman looks to subsequent lectures where he will discuss reforms enacted to address these weaknesses. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Welcome 09:54 - Chapter 2. Introduction to the Themes of the Course 18:48 - Chapter 3. The Roman Empire before the Crisis of the Third Century 34:09 - Chapter 4. Flaws of the Roman Empire Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2011.
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3. Foundations: Freud
 
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Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110) This lecture introduces students to the theories of Sigmund Freud, including a brief biographical description and his contributions to the field of psychology. The limitations of his theories of psychoanalysis are covered in detail, as well as the ways in which his conception of the unconscious mind still operate in mainstream psychology today. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Sigmund Freud in a Historical Context 06:51 - Chapter 2. Unconscious Motivation: The Id, Ego and Superego 13:45 - Chapter 3. Personality Development and Psychosexual Development 20:32 - Chapter 4. Defense Mechanisms, the Aims of Psychoanalysis, Dreams 29:11 - Chapter 5. Question and Answer on Freud's Theories 32:55 - Chapter 6. Controversies and Criticisms on Freud's Theories 42:10 - Chapter 7. Examples of the Unconscious in Modern Psychology 51:55 - Chapter 8. Further Question and Answer on Freud Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2007.
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Contract Law 2 Intro Ricketts v Scothorn (foregoing employment)
 
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Introduction to Contracts Ricketts v Scothorn (foregoing employment) To access case file, copy and paste link into browser - ianayres.com/sites/default/files/files/Ricketts%20v_%20Scothorn.docx These video lectures are taken from Prof. Ayres’ Coursera Courses: American Contract Law I & II. All lectures plus assessments, animations, and discussion forums will me made available on Coursera.org fall 2017!
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Human Emotion 14.1: Emotion Regulation I (What is Emotion Regulation)
 
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Human Emotion; Professor June Gruber, Yale University 00:00 Chapter 1. Introduction to Lecture 02:43 Chapter 2. What is Emotion Regulation? 11:32 Chapter 3. Take-Away Questions 12:04 Chapter 4. Expert Interview This course is part of a broader educational mission to share the study of human emotion beyond the boundaries of the classroom in order to reach students and teachers alike, both locally and globally, through the use of technology. This mission is generously supported by, and in collaboration with, the Yale Office of Digital Dissemination and the Yale College Dean's Office. This series was recorded and produced by Douglas Forbush, Lucas Swineford, and the Yale Broadcasting and Media Center. Course website: http://www.yalepeplab.com/teaching/psych131_summer2013/index.php
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Contract Law 1 Intro Hamer v Sidway (just say no)
 
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Introduction to Contracts Hammer v. Sidway (just say no). To access case file, copy and paste link into browser - ianayres.com/sites/default/files/files/Hamer%20v_%20Sidwell.docx These video lectures are taken from Prof. Ayres’ Coursera Courses: American Contract Law I & II. All lectures plus assessments, animations, and discussion forums will me made available on Coursera.org fall 2017!
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1. Introduction: five first lessons
 
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Game Theory (ECON 159) We introduce Game Theory by playing a game. We organize the game into players, their strategies, and their goals or payoffs; and we learn that we should decide what our goals are before we make choices. With some plausible payoffs, our game is a prisoners' dilemma. We learn that we should never choose a dominated strategy; but that rational play by rational players can lead to bad outcomes. We discuss some prisoners' dilemmas in the real world and some possible real-world remedies. With other plausible payoffs, our game is a coordination problem and has very different outcomes: so different payoffs matter. We often need to think, not only about our own payoffs, but also others' payoffs. We should put ourselves in others' shoes and try to predict what they will do. This is the essence of strategic thinking. 00:00 - Chapter 1. What Is Strategy? 02:16 - Chapter 2. Strategy: Where Does It Apply? 02:54 - Chapter 3. (Administrative Issues) 09:40 - Chapter 4. Elements of a Game: Strategies, Actions, Outcomes and Payoffs 21:38 - Chapter 5. Strictly Dominant versus Strictly Dominated Strategies 29:33 - Chapter 6. Contracts and Collusion 33:35 - Chapter 7. The Failure of Collusion and Inefficient Outcomes: Prisoner's Dilemma 41:40 - Chapter 8. Coordination Problems 01:07:53 - Chapter 9. Lesson Recap Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2007.
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Contract Law 22 II Lucy v Zehmer (joking offer)
 
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II. THE BARGAIN RELATIONSHIP A. Manifestation of Mutual Assent Lucy v. Zehmer (joking offer) To access case file, copy and paste link into browser - ianayres.com/sites/default/files/files/Lucy%20v_%20Zehmer.docx These video lectures are taken from Prof. Ayres’ Coursera Courses: American Contract Law I & II. All lectures plus assessments, animations, and discussion forums will me made available on Coursera.org fall 2017!
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1. Introduction
 
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Listening to Music (MUSI 112) Professor Wright introduces the course by suggesting that "listening to music" is not simply a passive activity one can use to relax, but rather, an active and rewarding process. He argues that by learning about the basic elements of Western classical music, such as rhythm, melody, and form, one learns strategies that can be used to understand many different kinds of music in a more thorough and precise way -- and further, one begins to understand the magnitude of human greatness. Professor Wright draws the music examples in this lecture from recordings of techno music, American musical theater, and works by Mozart, Beethoven, Debussy and Strauss, in order to introduce the issues that the course will explore in more depth throughout the semester. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to Listening to Music 03:23 - Chapter 2. Why Listen to Classical Music? 12:14 - Chapter 3. Course Requirements and Pedagogy 21:11 - Chapter 4. Diagnostic Quiz 33:56 - Chapter 5. Pitch 42:04 - Chapter 6. Rhythm Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2008.
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02. The Crisis of the Third Century and the Diocletianic Reforms
 
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The Early Middle Ages, 284--1000 (HIST 210) Professor Freedman outlines the problems facing the Roman Empire in the third century. The Persian Sassanid dynasty in the East and various Germanic tribes in the West threatened the Empire as never before. Internally, the Empire struggled with the problem of succession, an economy wracked by inflation, and the decline of the local elite which had once held it together. Having considered these issues, Professor Freedman then moves on to the reforms enacted under Diocletian to stabilize the Empire. He attempted to solve the problem of succession by setting up a system of joint rule called the Tetrarchy, to stabilize the economy through tax reform, and to protect the frontiers through militarization. Although many of his policies failed--some within his lifetime--Diocletian nevertheless saved the Roman Empire from collapse. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction and Logistics 01:35 - Chapter 2. Third Century Crisis and Barbarian Invasions 10:10 - Chapter 3. The Problem of Succession 17:36 - Chapter 4. The Problem of Inflation 22:48 - Chapter 5. The Ruin of The Local Elite 26:08 - Chapter 6. Diocletian and his Reforms Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2011.
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Everyday Parenting - Praise Technique
 
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This is a full technique video from Dr. Alan E. Kazdin's massive open online course on Coursera called "Everyday Parenting: The ABCs of Child Rearing." Enroll today: https://www.coursera.org/learn/everyday-parenting?utm_source=YALE&utm_medium=institutions&utm_campaign=Newsletter-201708-Youtube-EP
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15. Guest Lecture by Carl Icahn
 
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Financial Markets (ECON 252) Mr. Carl Icahn, a prominent activist investor in corporate America, talks about his career and how he became interested in finance and involved in shareholder activism. He discusses his thoughts about today's economy and American businesses and their inherent threats and opportunities. He believes that the biggest challenge facing corporate America is weak management and that today's CEOs, with exceptions, might not be the most capable of leading global companies. He sees opportunities for current, intelligent college students to succeed in the corporate world if they work hard and can identify valuable business pursuits. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Carl Icahn: A Self-Introduction 06:10 - Chapter 2. An Anti-Darwinian Corporate America 19:56 - Chapter 3. Questions: Personal Motivation and Inspiration 29:21 - Chapter 4. Questions: Activist Investing in the Real World 38:53 - Chapter 5. Questions: Sensing Potential in Poorly Managed Companies Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2008.
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2. From Stories to Canon
 
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Introduction to New Testament (RLST 152) The Christian faith is based upon a canon of texts considered to be holy scripture. How did this canon come to be? Different factors, such as competing schools of doctrine, growing consensus, and the invention of the codex, helped shape the canon of the New Testament. Reasons for inclusion in or exclusion from the canon included apostolic authority, general acceptance, and theological appropriateness for "proto-orthodox" Christianity. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Canon vs. Scripture 16:17 - Chapter 2. The Forming of Canons 27:04 - Chapter 3. The Invention of the Codex 32:50 - Chapter 4. A Slowly Developing (and Incomplete) Consensus 42:02 - Chapter 5. The Reasons for Canonical Inclusion and Exclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2009.
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Contract Law 6 Intro Jacob & Youngs v Kent (reading pipe)
 
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Introduction to Contracts Jacob & Youngs v. Kent (reading pipe) - To access case file, copy and paste link into browser - ianayres.com/sites/default/files/files/Jacob%20&%20Youngs%20v_%20Kent.docx These video lectures are taken from Prof. Ayres’ Coursera Courses: American Contract Law I & II. All lectures plus assessments, animations, and discussion forums will me made available on Coursera.org fall 2017!
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22. Vikings / The European Prospect, 1000
 
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The Early Middle Ages, 284--1000 (HIST 210) In the first part of this lecture, Professor Freedman discusses the emergence of the Vikings from Scandinavia in the ninth and tenth centuries. The Vikings were highly adaptive, raiding (the Carolingian Empire), trading (Byzantium and the Caliphate) or settling (Greenland and Iceland) depending on local conditions. Through their wide-ranging travels, the Vikings created networks bringing into contact parts of the world that were previously either not connected or minimally so. Professor Freedman concludes the lecture, and the course, by considering what's been accomplished between 284 and 1000. Although Europe in the year 1000 experienced many of the same problems as did the Roman Empire 284 where we began -- population decline and lack of urbanization, among others -- the end of the early Middle Ages also arguable heralds the emergence of Europe and Christendom as cultural constructs and sets the stage for the rise of the West. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction 13:52 - Chapter 2. The Vikings in England and on the Continent 21:05 - Chapter 3. The Vikings in the East 29:20 - Chapter 4. The Vikings in the West 37:09 - Chapter 5. Conclusion: What's been accomplished? Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2011.
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1. Introduction
 
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Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110) Professor Paul Bloom welcomes students and presents the course as a comprehensive introduction to the study of the human mind. Course readings and requirements are discussed. The five main branches of psychology are presented: neuroscience, which is a study of the mind by looking at the brain; developmental, which focuses on how people grow and learn; cognitive, which refers to the computational approach to studying the mind; social, which studies how people interact; and clinical, which examines mental health and mental illnesses. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to and Requirements for the Course 10:03 - Chapter 2. General Goals for the Course 13:07 - Chapter 3. Examples of Materials Covered in the Course Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2007.
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1. Introduction
 
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Dante in Translation (ITAL 310) Professor Mazzotta introduces students to the general scheme and scope of the Divine Comedy and to the life of its author. Various genres to which the poem belongs (romance, epic, vision) are indicated, and special attention is given to its place within the encyclopedic tradition. The poem is then situated historically through an overview of Dante's early poetic and political careers and the circumstances that led to his exile. Professor Mazzotta concludes by discussing the central role Dante's exile was to play in his poetic project. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: A Circle of Knowledge 07:28 - Chapter 2. Dante in a Historical Context 17:16 - Chapter 3. General Housekeeping Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2008
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1. Introduction: Why Study the New Testament?
 
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Introduction to New Testament (RLST 152) This course approaches the New Testament not as scripture, or a piece of authoritative holy writing, but as a collection of historical documents. Therefore, students are urged to leave behind their pre-conceived notions of the New Testament and read it as if they had never heard of it before. This involves understanding the historical context of the New Testament and imagining how it might appear to an ancient person. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Why Take This Course? 13:23 - Chapter 2. The Bible As A Historical Text 24:17 - Chapter 3. Imagining An Ancient's Perspective 30:45 - Chapter 4. Q&A 35:08 - Chapter 5. Going over the Syllabus Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2009.
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1. The Nature of Evolution: Selection, Inheritance, and History
 
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Principles of Evolution, Ecology and Behavior (EEB 122) The lecture presents an overview of evolutionary biology and its two major components, microevolution and macroevolution. The idea of evolution goes back before Darwin, although Darwin thought of natural selection. Evolution is driven by natural selection, the correlation between organism traits and reproductive success, as well as random drift. The history of life goes back approximately 3.7 billion years to a common ancestor, and is marked with key events that affect all life. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction 03:22 - Chapter 2. History of Evolutionary Studies 15:59 - Chapter 3. Conditions for Natural Selection 21:25 - Chapter 4. The Power of Selection and Adaptation 27:09 - Chapter 5. Drift 31:10 - Chapter 6. History of Life 39:33 - Chapter 7. Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2009.
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2. The nature of persons: dualism vs. physicalism
 
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Death (PHIL 176) Professor Kagan discusses the two main positions with regard to the question, "What is a person?" On the one hand, there is the dualist view, according to which a person is a body and a soul. On the other hand, the physicalist view argues that a person is just a body. The body, however, has a certain set of abilities and is capable of a large range of activities. 00:00 - Chapter 1. "Is There Life After Death?" Asking the Right Question 13:25 - Chapter 2. Ways to Conceptualize Self-Identity 21:18 - Chapter 3. Dualists: The Body-Soul Perspective 39:00 - Chapter 4. The Physicalists: The Body Is a Body and Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2007.
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Lecture 4. Doublets and Contradictions, Seams and Sources
 
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Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes This lecture continues the discussion on Genesis, including the familiar accounts of Cain and Abel, the Flood and Noahide covenant. The story of Cain and Abel expresses the notion of the God-endowed sanctity of human life and a "universal moral law" governing the world. Examination of the contradictions and doublets in the flood story leads to a discussion of the complex composition and authorship of the Pentateuch. These features as well as anachronisms challenge traditional religious convictions of Moses as the author of the first five books of the Bible. 00:00 - Chapter 1. The Taming of Enkidu in The "Epic of Gilgamesh" 05:44 - The Story of Enkidu as Parallel to the Second Story of Creation in Genesis 21:29 - Major Themes in the Story of Cain and Abel 24:02 - Comparing Mesopotamian, Semitic and Israelite Flood Stories 35:32 - Contradictions and Doublets in the Flood Story in Genesis 6-9 42:42 - Implications of the Repetitions and Contradictions throughout the Bible Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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4. Philosophers and Kings: Plato's Republic, I-II
 
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Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114) Lecture 4 introduces Plato's Republic and its many meanings in the context of moral psychology, justice, the power of poetry and myth, and metaphysics. The Republic is also discussed as a utopia, presenting an extreme vision of a polis--Kallipolis--Plato's ideal city. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction 03:04 - Chapter 2. What Is Plato's "Republic" About? 17:38 - Chapter 3. I Went Down to the Piraeus 22:05 - Chapter 4. The Seventh Letter 30:00 - Chapter 5. Analyzing the Beginning of "Republic" and the Hierarchy of Characters 38:13 - Chapter 6. Cephalus Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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19. The Early Middle Ages, 284--1000: Charlemagne
 
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The Early Middle Ages, 284--1000 (HIST 210) In this lecture, Professor Freedman discusses the Carolingian dynasty from its origins through its culmination in the figure of Charlemagne. The Carolingians sought to overthrow the much weakened Merovingian dynasty by establishing their political legitimacy on three bases: war leadership, Christian rule, and the legacy of Rome. Charlemagne's grandfather Charles Martel won a major victory over the Muslims in 733 at the Battle of Poitiers. Charlemagne's father Pepin the Short allied the Carolingians with the papacy at a time when the latter was looking for a new protector. Charlemagne, crowned emperor in Rome by Pope Leo III in 800, made strides in reestablishing the Roman Empire; although, being centered in northern Europe, his was not an exact imitation of the Roman Empire. Professor Freedman concludes the lecture with the observation that Charlemagne can be considered the founder of Europe as a political and cultural expression. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction 07:43 - Chapter 2. The Last Years of the Merovingians 16:46 - Chapter 3. Establishing Carolingian Legitimacy 27:25 - Chapter 4. Charles Martel and Pepin the Short 34:54 - Chapter 5. Charlemagne Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2011.
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10. New Modes and Orders: Machiavelli's The Prince (chaps. 1-12)
 
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Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114) The lecture begins with an introduction of Machiavelli's life and the political scene in Renaissance Florence. Professor Smith asserts that Machiavelli can be credited as the founder of the modern state, having reconfigured elements from both the Christian empire and the Roman republic, creating therefore a new form of political organization that is distinctly his own. Machiavelli's state has universalist ambitions, just like its predecessors, but it has been liberated from Christian and classical conceptions of virtue. The management of affairs is left to the princes, a new kind of political leaders, endowed with ambition, love of glory, and even elements of prophetic authority. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Video of "The Third Man" 02:20 - Chapter 2. Introduction: Who Was Machiavelli? 15:33 - Chapter 3. "The Prince": Title and Dedication of the Book 21:52 - Chapter 4. The Distinction between Armed and Unarmed Prophets 26:10 - Chapter 5. Good and Evil, Virtue and Vice Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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1. Introduction: Freeman's Top Five Tips for Studying the Revolution
 
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The American Revolution (HIST 116) Professor Freeman offers an introduction to the course, summarizing the readings and discussing the course's main goals. She also offers five tips for studying the Revolution: 1) Avoid thinking about the Revolution as a story about facts and dates; 2) Remember that words we take for granted today, like "democracy," had very different meanings; 3) Think of the "Founders" as real people rather than mythic historic figures; 4) Remember that the "Founders" aren't the only people who count in the Revolution; 5) Remember the importance of historical contingency: that anything could have happened during the Revolution. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Is the War Part of the American Revolution? 08:24 - Chapter 2. Reading Materials for the Course 13:45 - Chapter 3. Freeman's Tips One and Two: Facts and Meanings 22:13 - Chapter 4. Freeman's Tip Three: The Founders Were Human, Too 31:33 - Chapter 5. Freeman's Tip Four: The Other Revolutionaries 37:48 - Chapter 6. Freeman's Tip Five and Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2010.
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17. Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian
 
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The American Novel Since 1945 (ENGL 291) In this first of two lectures on Blood Meridian, Professor Hungerford walks us through some of the novel's major sources and influences, showing how McCarthy engages both literary tradition and American history, and indeed questions of origins and originality itself. The Bible, Moby-Dick, Paradise Lost, the poetry of William Wordsworth, and the historical narrative of Sam Chamberlain all contribute to the style and themes of this work that remains, in its own right, a provocative meditation on history, one that explores the very limits of narrative and human potential. 00:00 - Chapter 1. The Literary Tradition: Allusions and Revisions 08:49 - Chapter 2. Eradicating Interiority: "Moby Dick" 20:50 - Chapter 3. Modeling Evil: "Paradise Lost" 30:13 - Chapter 4: Rejecting Innocence: Wordsworth 34:59 - Chapter 5. Historical Sources: Samuel Chamberlin's "My Confession" Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2008.
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Lecture 5. Melody: Notes, Scales, Nuts and Bolts
 
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Listening to Music (MUSI 112) This lecture explores the basic nature of melody. Touching on historical periods ranging from ancient Greece to the present day, Professor Wright draws examples from musical worlds as disparate as nineteenth-century Europe and twentieth-century India, China, and America. Professor Wright puts forth a historical, technical, and holistic approach to understanding the way pitches and scales work in music. He concludes his lecture by bringing pitch and rhythm together in a discussion of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. 00:00 - Chapter 1. The Nature of Melody 02:37 - Chapter 2. The Development of Notes and the Scale 14:43 - Chapter 3. Major, Minor, and Chromatic Scales in World Music 33:03 - Chapter 4. Pitch and Rhythm in Beethoven's Ninth Symphony Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2008.
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17. A Person in the World of People: Self and Other, Part II;
 
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Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110) This lecture begins with the second half of the discussion on social psychology. Students will learn about several important factors influencing how we form impressions of others, including our ability to form rapid impressions about people. This discussion focuses heavily upon stereotypes, including a discussion of their utility, reliability, and the negative effects that even implicit stereotypes can incur. The second half of the lecture introduces students to two prominent mysteries in the field of psychology. First, students will learn what is known and unknown about sleep, including why we sleep, the different types of sleep, disorders, and of course, dreams, what they are about and why we have them. Second, this half reviews how laughter remains a mysterious and interesting psychological phenomenon. Students will hear theories that attempt to explain what causes us to laugh and why, with a particular emphasis on current evolutionary theory. 00:00 - Chapter 1. First and Fast: How We Form Impressions of Others 11:15 - Chapter 2. Positive Uses and Negative Effects of Stereotypes 27:19 - Chapter 3. Implicit Attitudes 34:47 - Chapter 4. Question and Answer on Stereotypes 38:09 - Chapter 5. The Minor Mystery of Sleep 44:49 - Chapter 6. The Greater Mystery of Dreams 51:31 - Chapter 7. The True Mystery of Laughter Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2007.
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16. The Rawlsian Social Contract
 
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Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118) The next and final Enlightenment tradition to be examined in the class is that of John Rawls, who, according to Professor Shapiro, was a hugely important figure not only in contemporary political philosophy, but also in the field of philosophy as a whole. Today, the class is introduced to some of the principal features of Rawls's theory of justice, such as the original position and the veil of ignorance, two of Rawls's most important philosophical innovations. Rawls channels Kant's categorical imperative because he asks individuals who would hypothetically be making choices about the structure of society to consider what would be desirable regardless of who they turned out to be--high IQ or low IQ, male or female, black or white, rich or poor. Rawls does not want to consider utility or welfare, but rather something more concrete--resources. And for him, these resources are liberties, opportunities, income and wealth, and the social bases of self-respect. The first of these leads to Rawls's first principle of justice, which states, "Each person is to have an equal right to the most extensive total system of liberties compatible with a similar system of liberty for all." Professor Shapiro animates this principle by asking, "Should there be an established religion?" For Rawls, the approach to answering this question is from the standpoint of the most adversely affected person. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Political Liberalism: John Rawls (1921 -- 2002) 11:59 - Chapter 2. Insights and Questions in Rawls's Theory of Justice 34:15 - Chapter 3. Resourcism and The General Conception of Justice Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2010.
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2. Being a British Colonist
 
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The American Revolution (HIST 116) Professor Freeman discusses what it meant to be a British colonist in America in the eighteenth century. She explains how American colonists had deep bonds of tradition and culture with Great Britain. She argues that, as British colonists with a strong sense of their British liberties, settlers in America valued their liberties above all else. She also explains that many Americans had a sense of inferiority when they compared their colonial lifestyles to the sophistication of Europe. Professor Freeman discusses the social order in America during the eighteenth century, and suggests that the lack of an entrenched aristocracy made social rank more fluid in America than in Europe. She ends the lecture by suggesting that the great importance that American colonists placed on British liberties and their link with Britain helped pave the way for the Revolution. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction 02:02 - Chapter 2. Association of Colonists' Identity to English Monarchy 11:51 - Chapter 3. The British Colonists' Inferiority Complex 20:34 - Chapter 4. The Fluidity of American Social Order: Gentry Minorities, Prisoners, and Religious Exiles 35:02 - Chapter 5. Salutary Neglect's Effect on British Liberties in the Colonies and Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2010.
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Introduction to Classical Music by Craig Wright on Coursera
 
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Everyday, billions of people choose to listen to music. Why do we need music? Why do we need art? What is art? How does classical music work and what makes it so great? Join Craig Wright in exploring some of the answers to these questions while learning about great musicians such as Mozart, Bach, and Beethoven in his Coursera course: Introduction to Classical Music starting January 2015.
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21. Democratic Statecraft: Tocqueville's Democracy in America
 
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Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114) With the emergence of democracies in Europe and the New World at the beginning of the nineteenth century, political philosophers began to re-evaluate the relationship between freedom and equality. Tocqueville, in particular, saw the creation of new forms of social power that presented threats to human liberty. His most famous work, Democracy in America, was written for his French countrymen who were still devoted to the restoration of the monarchy and whom Tocqueville wanted to convince that the democratic social revolution he had witnessed in America was equally representative of France's future. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Tocqueville's Problem 08:36 - Chapter 2. Who Was Alexis de Tocqueville? 14:04 - Chapter 3. Democracy in America and the Letter to Kergolay 35:46 - Chapter 4. The CharacterIstics of American Democracy: Importance of Local Government Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Experts in Emotion 14.1 -- James Gross on Emotion Regulation
 
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Experts in Emotion Series; Director: June Gruber, Yale University In this episode, you will learn about Emotion Regulation with Dr. James Gross from Stanford University. Dr. Gross will share what first got him interested in this topic and highlight a few core themes in his research. Dr. Gross will discuss exciting future discoveries on this topic. The interview will conclude with a few words of advice for getting involved in the field of emotion. 00:00 Chapter 1. Introduction to Dr. James Gross 01:20 Chapter 2. What got you interested in studying emotion? 02:27 Chapter 3. What are the central discoveries of your work? 17:41 Chapter 4. What do you see in store for the future of emotion? 20:26 Chapter 5. What is your advice to viewers? The Experts in Emotion Series provides a unique opportunity to explore the mysteries of human emotion guided by some of the world's foremost experts on the subject, ranging from distinguished academics to leading figures behind social media services like Facebook. In addition to tackling central questions such as what emotions are, why we have them, and how our understanding of them can lead to happier and healthier lives, you'll also hear first-hand about what first led these key players to study emotion and what they see as the most exciting frontiers ahead. This series is part of a broader educational mission to share the study of human emotion beyond the boundaries of the classroom in order to reach students and teachers alike, both locally and globally, through the use of technology. This mission is generously supported by, and in collaboration with, the Yale Office of Digital Dissemination and the Yale College Dean's Office. This series was recorded and produced by Douglas Forbush, Lucas Swineford, and the Yale Broadcasting and Media Center.
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Lecture 7. Harmony: Chords and How to Build Them
 
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Listening to Music (MUSI 112) Professor Wright explains the way harmony works in Western music. Throughout the lecture, he discusses the ways in which triads are formed out of scales, the ways that some of the most common harmonic progressions work, and the nature of modulation. Professor Wright focuses particularly on the listening skills involved in hearing whether harmonies are changing at regular or irregular rates in a given musical phrase. His musical examples in this lecture are wide-ranging, including such diverse styles as grand opera, bluegrass, and 1960s American popular music. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to Harmony 03:36 - Chapter 2. The Formation and Changing of Chords 19:50 - Chapter 3. Harmonic Progressions 35:54 - Chapter 4. Major and Minor Harmonies in Popular Music 42:38 - Chapter 5. Modulation through Harmony Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2008.
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2. Foundations: This Is Your Brain
 
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Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110) This lecture introduces students to two broad theories of how the mind relates to the body. Dualism is the ubiquitous and intuitive feeling that our conscious mind is separate from our physical bodies, whereas Materialism is the idea that all of our mental states are caused by physical states of the brain. This lecture reviews arguments explaining why materialism has become the predominant theory of mind in psychology. This discussion is followed by a basic overview of the neurophysiology of the brain. 00:00 - Chapter 1. The Brain, the Mind and Dualism 12:06 - Chapter 2. Scientific Consensus Against Dualism 19:28 - Chapter 3. The Neuron: The Basic Building Blocks of Thought 32:58 - Chapter 4. The Different Parts of the Brain 44:47 - Chapter 5. Mechanist Conception and the Hard Problem of Consciousness Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2007.
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15. Constitutional Government: Locke's Second Treatise (1-5)
 
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Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114) John Locke had such a profound influence on Thomas Jefferson that he may be deemed an honorary founding father of the United States. He advocated the natural equality of human beings, their natural rights to life, liberty, and property, and defined legitimate government in terms that Jefferson would later use in the Declaration of Independence. Locke's life and works are discussed, and the lecture shows how he transformed ideas previously formulated by Machiavelli and Hobbes into a more liberal constitutional theory of the state. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Who Is John Locke? 13:11 - Chapter 2. John Locke's Theory of Natural Law 31:27 - Chapter 3. Property, Labor and the Theory of Natural Law Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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1.  Introduction: What is Political Philosophy?
 
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Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114) Professor Smith discusses the nature and scope of "political philosophy." The oldest of the social sciences, the study of political philosophy must begin with the works of Plato and Aristotle, and examine in depth the fundamental concepts and categories of the study of politics. The questions "which regimes are best?" and "what constitutes good citizenship?" are posed and discussed in the context of Plato's Apology. 00:00 - Chapter 1. What Is Political Philosophy? 12:16 - Chapter 2. What Is a Regime? 22:19 - Chapter 3. Who Is a Statesman? What Is a Statesman? 27:22 - Chapter 4. What Is the Best Regime? Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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9.1 - Mental disorders: Explanations
 
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"Evolutionary Medicine" Sinauer Associates (2015) is the textbook that supports these lectures. Instructors can request examination copies and sign up to download figures here: http://www.sinauer.com/catalog/medical/evolutionary-medicine.html
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6. The Gospel of Mark
 
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Introduction to New Testament (RLST 152) The Gospels of the New Testament are not biographies, and, in this class, they are read through a historical critical lens. This means that the events they narrate are not taken at face value as historical. The Gospel of Mark illustrates how the gospel writer skillfully crafts a narrative in order to deliver a message. It is a message that emphasizes a suffering messiah, and the necessity of suffering before glory. The gospel's apocalyptic passages predict troubles for the Jewish temple and incorporate this prediction with its understanding of the future coming of the Son of Man. 00:00 - Chapter 1. The Gospels Not As Biographies 13:44 - Chapter 2. A Historical Critical Reading of Mark 22:18 - Chapter 3. Mark's Messiah 30:26 - Chapter 4. The Apocalyptic in Mark Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2009.
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23. How to live given the certainty of death
 
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Death (PHIL 176) In this lecture, Professor Kagan invites students to pose the question of how one should live life knowing that it will certainly end in death. He also explores the issue of how we should set our goals and how we should go about achieving them, bearing in mind the time constraints. Other questions raised are how this ultimately affects the quality of our work and our accomplishments, as well as how we decide what is worth doing in life. 00:00 - Chapter 1. How Carefully Should We Live? 11:21 - Chapter 2. Time Constraints and Goals: Finding Appropriate Contents for Life 17:30 - Chapter 3. Quantity of Life: The More, the Better? 32:38 - Chapter 4. Semi-Immortality through Accomplishments 40:21 - Chapter 5. Life Is Suffering: An Alternative Approach to Living Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2007.
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1.  Introductions: Why Does the Civil War Era Have a Hold on American Historical
 
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The Civil War and Reconstruction (HIST 119) Professor Blight offers an introduction to the course. He summarizes some of the course readings, and discusses the organization of the course is discussed. Professor Blight offers some thoughts on the nature of history and the study of history, before moving into a discussion of the reasons for Americans' enduring fascination with the Civil War. The reasons include: the human passion for epics, Americans' fondness for redemption narratives, the Civil War as a moment of "racial reckoning," the fascination with loss and lost causes, interest in military history, and the search for the origins of the modern United States. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction 03:09 - Chapter 2. Course Texts and Structure 10:47 - Chapter 3. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Promissory Note" 15:31 - Chapter 4. Books and the Purpose of History 22:00 - Chapter 5. Why Study the Civil War? 38:46 - Chapter 6. Whitman's "Democracy" and Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2008.
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20. Democracy and Participation: Rousseau's Social Contract, I-II
 
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Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114) The concept of "general will" is considered Rousseau's most important contribution to political science. It is presented as the answer to the gravest problems of civilization, namely, the problems of inequality, amour-propre, and general discontent. The social contract is the foundation of the general will and the answer to the problem of natural freedom, because nature itself provides no guidelines for determining who should rule. The lecture ends with Rousseau's legacy and the influence he exercised on later nineteenth-century writers and philosophers. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Social Contract and the General Will 25:04 - Chapter 2. Applications of the General Will 30:54 - Chapter 3. The Legacies of Rousseau Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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06. Transformation of the Roman Empire
 
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The Early Middle Ages, 284--1000 (HIST 210) The Roman Empire in the West collapsed as a political entity in the fifth century although the Eastern part survived the crisis.. Professor Freedman considers this transformation through three main questions: Why did the West fall apart -- because of the external pressure of invasions or the internal problems of institutional decline? Who were these invading barbarians? Finally, does this transformation mark a gradual shift or is it right to regard it as a cataclysmic end of civilization? Professor Freedman, as a moderate catastrophist, argues that this period marked the end of a particular civilization rather than the end of civilization in general. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction 05:43 - Chapter 2. Catastrophe 18:43 - Chapter 3. The Roman Army and the Visigoths 28:25 - Chapter 4. Another Kind of Barbarian: The Huns 34:19 - Chapter 5. Accomodation 38:55 - Chapter 6. Decline Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2011.
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Lecture 3. The Hebrew Bible in Its Ancient Near Eastern Setting: Genesis 1-4 in Context
 
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Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes In the first of a series of lectures on the book of Genesis, the basic elements of biblical monotheism are compared with Ancient Near Eastern texts to show a non-mythological, non-theogonic conception of the deity, a new conception of the purpose and meaning of human life, nature, magic and myth, sin and evil, ethics (including the universal moral law) and history. The two creation stories are explored and the work of Nahum Sarna is introduced. 00:00 - Chapter 1. The Creation Story in "Enuma Elish" 12:44 - Chapter 2. The Creation Stories in Genesis 28:30 - Chapter 3. Creation as God Imposing Order on the World 38:17 - Allusion to and Resonances of Ancient Near Eastern Themes Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Lecture 2. Introduction to Instruments and Musical Genres
 
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Listening to Music (MUSI 112) This lecture provides an introduction to basic classical music terminology, orchestral instruments, and acoustics. Professor Wright begins with a brief discussion of the distinctions between such broad terms as "song" and "piece," briefly mentioning more specific terms for musical genres, such as "symphony" and "opera." He then moves on to describe the differences between a "motive" and a "theme," demonstrating the distinction between the two with the use of music by Beethoven and Tchaikovsky. Following this, he calls upon three guest instrumentalists on French horn, bassoon, and viola to give a brief performance-introduction to each instrument. He concludes the session with a discussion of acoustics, focusing on the concept of partials, and then brings the lecture to a close with commentary on Richard Strauss's tone-poem, Death and Transfiguration. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Distinguishing "Songs" from "Pieces": Musical Lexicon 04:23 - Chapter 2. Genres, Motives, and Themes 16:51 - Chapter 3. Introduction to the French Horn and Partials 23:02 - Chapter 4. The Bassoon and the Viola 29:14 - Chapter 5. Mugorsky and the Basic Principles of Acoustics 40:30 - Chapter 6. Dissonance and Consonance in Strauss's Death and Transfiguration Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2008.
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05. St. Augustine's Confessions
 
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The Early Middle Ages, 284--1000 (HIST 210) Professor Freedman begins the lecture by considering the ways historians read the Confessions.In this work, St. Augustine gives unique insight into the life of an intellectual mind in Late Antiquity, into the impact of Christianity on the Roman Empire, and into the problems of early Christianity. The three major doctrinal concerns of the early Church were the problem of evil, the soul-body distinction, and issues of sin and redemption. In the Confessions, St. Augustine searches for explanations of these problems first in Manichaeism, then (Neo)Platonism, and finally Christianity.Underlying this narrative are Augustine's ideas of opposition to perfectionism, his exaltation of grace, and the notion of sin as indelible, not solvable. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Why we read The Confessions 08:04 - Chapter 2. A Brief Biography of Augustine 15:03 - Chapter 3. The Problem of Evil 25:30 - Chapter 4. Pears and Augustine's Conception of Sin 38:53 - Chapter 5. Perfectability, Sin, and Grac Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2011.
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1. Introduction
 
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Introduction to Ancient Greek History (CLCV 205) Professor Donald Kagan explains why people should study the ancient Greeks. He argues that the Greeks are worthy of our study not only because of their vast achievements and contributions to Western civilization (such as in the fields of science, law, and politics) but also because they offer a unique perspective on humanity. To the Greeks, man was both simultaneously capable of the greatest achievements and the worst crimes; he was both great and important, but also mortal and fallible. He was a tragic figure, powerful but limited. Therefore, by studying the Greeks, one gains insight into a tension that has gripped and shaped the West and the rest of the world through its influence. In short, to study the Greeks is to study the nature of human experience. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Ancient Greece as the Foundation of Western Civilization 13:06 - Chapter 2. The Judeo Christian Tradition 24:50 - Chapter 3. Problems Posed by the Western Tradition Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2007.
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2. Socratic Citizenship: Plato's Apology
 
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Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114) The lecture begins with an explanation of why Plato's Apology is the best introductory text to the study of political philosophy. The focus remains on the Apology as a symbol for the violation of free expression, with Socrates justifying his way of life as a philosopher and defending the utility of philosophy for political life. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Plato, Apology 09:31 - Chapter 2. Political Context of the Dialogue 19:19 - Chapter 3. Accusations Leveled Against Socrates 27:51 - Chapter 4. Clouds: Debunking Socrates' New Model of Citizenship 33:31 - Chapter 5. The Famous Socratic "Turn"; Socrates' Second Sailing Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Contract Law 18 I Mills v Wyman (moral obligation)
 
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I. CONSIDERATION AND ITS SUBSTITUTES THE CONSIDERATION DOCTRINE F. Quasi-Contract and Moral Obligation Mills v. Wyman (moral obligation) To access case file, copy and paste link into browser - ianayres.com/sites/default/files/files/Mills%20v_%20Wyman.docx Webb v. McGowin (rescuer’s recompense) To access case file, copy and paste link into browser - ianayres.com/sites/default/files/files/Webb%20v_%20McGowin.docx These video lectures are taken from Prof. Ayres’ Coursera Courses: American Contract Law I & II. All lectures plus assessments, animations, and discussion forums will me made available on Coursera.org fall 2017!
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